cloud droplet

cloud droplet

[′klau̇d ‚dräp·lət]
(meteorology)
A particle of liquid water from a few micrometers to tens of micrometers in diameter, formed by condensation of atmospheric water vapor and suspended in the atmosphere with other drops to form a cloud.
References in periodicals archive ?
The interactions of BC particles with clouds as a function of BC properties will be investigated with in-situ measurements by operating quantitative single particle instruments behind a novel sampling inlet, which makes selective sampling of interstitial, cloud droplet residual or ice crystal residual particles possible.
Some proposed solutions to this problem, known as the faint young Sun problem, include an atmospheric composition with higher concentrations of greenhouse gases, higher atmospheric pressure, increased cloud droplet size, and changes in land distribution and Earth's rotation rate.
Although this reduction in cloud droplet number is not substantial, it has long been established that lower droplet concentrations help to accelerate the warm rain process (e.
These researchers--led by the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and NASA--also have developed a new instrument for measuring the conditions and time needed for a particle to become a cloud droplet.
In order to determine how a tropical cyclone will behave, the instruments will analyze many factors including: cloud droplet and aerosol concentrations, air temperature, wind speed and direction in storms and on the ocean's surface, air pressure, humidity, lightning, aerosols and water vapor.
Cloud models need to account for any such effect, so measurements of cloud droplet concentrations and size in clean ocean air and dusty air from the Sahara need to be made.
cloud cover, cloud radiation properties, cloud droplet size, optical thickness), in ocean science (e.
When large amounts of dust are present, hurricane formation tends to be suppressed, because the dust interacts with cloud droplets in ways that prevent thunderstorms from transitioning into tropical storms and hurricanes.
Our planet is home to a great amount of liquid water, from the seas, lakes, underground aquifers and cloud droplets.
According to experts, a tornado is not necessarily visible; however, the intense low pressure caused by the high wind speeds and rapid rotation usually causes water vapours in the air to condense into cloud droplets due to adiabatic cooling.
When the air is humid enough, the particles swell into cloud droplets.
Some specific subjects include wave packets and turbulent jet noise, ice-sheet dynamics, flow in foams, growth of cloud droplets in a turbulent environment, spontaneous wave generation in geophysical flows, and sand ripples and dunes.