cloud particle

cloud particle

[′klau̇d ‚pärd·ə·kəl]
(meteorology)
A particle of water, either a drop of liquid water or an ice crystal, comprising a cloud.
References in periodicals archive ?
Topics include measurement of aircraft state and thermodynamic and dynamic variables; in situ measurements of gas, aerosol particles, and cloud and precipitation particles; aerosol and cloud particle sampling; atmospheric radiation measurements; hyperspectral remote sensing; and LIDAR and RADAR observations.
A cloud particle is basically water and aerosols," explains the study's lead author, Sudip Chakraborty, who recently received his Ph.
2012] CCNC Aerosol mass concentration (impactor sampling, on-line mass analyzer) Cloud particle size distribution Aerosol chemical composition [X-band scanning ARM cloud radar [aerosol chemical speciation (XSACR)] monitor (ACSM), Sunset EC/OC analyzer, monitor for aerosols and gases in ambient air (MARGA), filter sampling for off-line analysis] Hydrometeor fall velocity (XSACR) Trace gas concentrations and profiles (NO, N[O.
Classification into cloud particle types utilizes vertical structures of reflectivity, Doppler velocity, and temperature to identify three-dimensional ice (3D), horizontally oriented ice (2D), liquid water, the melting layer, snow, and rain.
2006a) made a detailed study of ice crystals using various in situ instruments including a cloud particle imaging probe and polar nephelometer at the South Pole Station; ice crystal number concentration of up to 500 [L.
Proceeding from the results of the influence of these mechanisms of electrization of cloud particles, described in detail in [3, 7], on the finely dispersed dielectric inclusions of a spherical shape moving in the ascending heat, we limit ourselves to the case where the received solid particle of radius [r.
The basic observation principle proposed for the Doppler estimation from an orbiting radar consists of correlating echosignals resulting respectively from a pair of successive transmit pulses at two orthogonal polarisations in order to derive the bulk particle motion of the atmospheric tracers such as cloud particles and precipitation.
When the Earth passes through, the dust cloud particles hit the atmosphere at 140,000mph and burn up in streaking ashes of light, creating the spectacle known as the Perseids.
The model included physical properties of the cloud particles as well as the ability to see convection, if it gets stronger or weaker.
The key finding: cloud particles at the top of the great storm are composed of a mix of three substances: water ice, ammonia ice, and an uncertain third constituent that is possibly ammonium hydrosulfide.
All precipitation - rain, hail, snow or sleet - begins with ice crystals forming around cloud particles.