cloud particle

cloud particle

[′klau̇d ‚pärd·ə·kəl]
(meteorology)
A particle of water, either a drop of liquid water or an ice crystal, comprising a cloud.
References in periodicals archive ?
processor technology with interactive cloud particle projection.
The imaging infrared radiometer operates continuously, providing information on cirrus cloud particle size and infrared emissions activity.
s Cloud Particle Imager (CPI), an instrument that takes high-resolution digital images of cloud particles and flew on NASA's WB-57 platform during the first week in July.
The NASA C-130, based at the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, will carry instruments that measure solar (incoming) and infrared (outgoing) radiation, ice surface elevation and cloud properties such as cloud particle size.
Topics include measurement of aircraft state and thermodynamic and dynamic variables; in situ measurements of gas, aerosol particles, and cloud and precipitation particles; aerosol and cloud particle sampling; atmospheric radiation measurements; hyperspectral remote sensing; and LIDAR and RADAR observations.
All precipitation - rain, hail, snow or sleet - begins with ice crystals forming around cloud particles.
x] falling within an environment of smaller cloud particles of radius Ry and fall velocity u([R.
Another was provided by Paul Wennberg, associate professor of atmospheric chemistry at Caltech, who developed an instrument that measured the chemical composition of stratospheric cloud particles.
Aerosols reflect sunlight and stimulate the growth of cloud particles, both of which can greatly influence Earth's climate.
SHEBA scientists used radar as well as a shipmounted green laser beam to sweep the Arctic sky and measure cloud particles.
Unlike pulp, which contains larger particles that soon sink to the bottom of your glass, cloud particles remain suspended longer.
When the Earth passes through, the dust cloud particles hit the atmosphere at 140,000 mph and burn up in streaking flashes of light, creating the spectacle known as the Perseids.