coacervate

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Related to coacervates: Proteinoids, Microspheres

coacervate

[kō′as·ər‚vāt]
(chemistry)
An aggregate of colloidal droplets bound together by the force of electrostatic attraction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Polyquaternium compounds are theorized to be useful in forming complex coacervates in the concentrated surfactant regime.
During this process, small droplets of silicone are flocculated, entrapped in the coacervate and deposited onto the surface of the hair.
3) The amount of coacervate generated depends on the surfactant composition and the nature of cationic polymer, including molecular weight and cationic charge density.
Copolymers of diallyldimethylammonium chloride and acrylamide have recently been advanced as coacervate depositing agents for skin, with the added advantage that they provide desired low viscosity/theology to the personal care compositions in which they are included.
This preferential solubility behavior allows the preparation of nanocapsules by heating homogenized dispersions of mixtures of shea butter, water and polycaprolactone oligomers to 80[degrees]C then cooling to 20[degrees]C to allow coacervate to form at the oil-water interfaces.
The complex also includes a polymer deposition aid that forms coacervates to help keep the silicones from washing away, acting as a net and capturing other care ingredients and bringing them down to the fabric surface for maximum effect and chlorine scavenger technology, which helps maintain bright colors and prevents dyes from fading by neutralizing chlorine in the wash water.
The original successful conditioning shampoos of the 1970s were based on the formation of coacervates of cationic polymer (such as polyquaternium-10 or guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride) and anionic surfactants.
The original successful conditioning shampoos of the 1970s were based upon the formation of coacervates of cationic polymer (such as Polyquaternium-10 or Guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride) and anionic surfactants.
The coacervates phase-separate from solution and they are adsorbed in the soap film as discrete heterogeneous domains that appear as thick "spots" in the film.
Since their inception in the 1970s, conditioning shampoos have been based upon the formation of dilution-deposition coacervates of polyquaternium-10 or guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride with anionic surfactant bases.
After centrifugation, the coacervates formed a clear gel layer at the bottom of the centrifugation tube.