Coach

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coach

1. a vehicle for several passengers, used for transport over long distances, sightseeing, etc.
2. a railway carriage carrying passengers
3. a trainer or instructor
4. a tutor who prepares students for examinations

Coach

 

(in Russian, omnibus), a multiseat horse-drawn vehicle used for transporting passengers; the earliest kind of public transportation, first introduced in Paris in 1662. In the 1820’s coaches were widely used in France and Great Britain; in the mid-19th century their use also spread to other countries of Western Europe and to the USA. They were also used in intercity transportation. Coaches ceased to be used in the early 20th century, when they were replaced by other modes of transportation.

In France the term omnibus is used to describe a regular passenger train, as distinguished from fast and express trains.


Coach

 

(in Russian, repetitor), in the cadet corps, corps of pages, and some other boarding schools in prerevolutionary Russia, the teacher who directed homework assignments.


Coach

 

a specialist in physical culture who offers training in his particular sport. A coach trains and educates athletes by helping them to master their skills and to develop their potential for competition. In the USSR, coaches are trained mainly at sport departments of physical culture institutes. In recognition of coaches who train athletes and teams that distinguish themselves at international and all-Union competitions, the honorary sport titles of Honored Coach of the USSR and Honored Coach of a Union republic have been established.

References in classic literature ?
A whisper, communicated from those who stood nearest the windows, now spread through the church; a hearse, with a train of several coaches, was creeping along the street, conveying some dead man to the churchyard, while the bride awaited a living one at the altar.
Andrews, Holborn, with the waggons and hackney- coaches roaring past him all the day and half the night like one great dragon.
That they have some high-fenced grove which they call a park; that they live in larger and better-garnished saloons than he has visited, and go in coaches, keeping only the society of the elegant, to watering-places and to distant cities,--these make the groundwork from which he has delineated estates of romance, compared with which their actual possessions are shanties and paddocks.
And people would pass the house, going off in wagonettes and coaches as jolly and merry as could be, the sun shining out, and not a cloud to be seen.
And off she did go--if coaches be feminine--amidst a loud flourish from the guard's horn, and the calm approval of all the judges of coaches and coach-horses congregated at the Peacock, but more especially of the helpers, who stood, with the cloths over their arms, watching the coach till it disappeared, and then lounged admiringly stablewards, bestowing various gruff encomiums on the beauty of the turn-out.
The coach which had brought the young lady and her maid, and which, perhaps, the reader may have hitherto concluded was her own, was, indeed, a returned coach belonging to Mr King, of Bath, one of the worthiest and honestest men that ever dealt in horse-flesh, and whose coaches we heartily recommend to all our readers who travel that road.
Tom and his father arrived in town from Berkshire the day before, and finding, on inquiry, that the Birmingham coaches which ran from the city did not pass through Rugby, but deposited their passengers at Dunchurch, a village three miles distant on the main road, where said passengers had to wait for the Oxford and Leicester coach in the evening, or to take a post-chaise, had resolved that Tom should travel down by the Tally-ho, which diverged from the main road and passed through Rugby itself.
But slow place, sir, slow place-off the main road, you see--only three coaches a day, and one on
The mail takes the lead in a four-horse waggon, and all the coaches follow in procession: headed by No.
The insides scream dismally; the coach stops; the horses flounder; all the other six coaches stop; and their four-and-twenty horses flounder likewise: but merely for company, and in sympathy with ours.
He despised gadding about; he looked upon coaches as things that ought to be indicted; as disturbers of the peace of mankind; as restless, bustling, busy, horn-blowing contrivances, quite beneath the dignity of men, and only suited to giddy girls that did nothing but chatter and go a-shopping.
Wheels come off, horses take fright, coachmen drive too fast, coaches overturn.

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