coalescent


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coalescent

[‚kō·ə′les·ənt]
(chemistry)
Chemical additive used in immiscible liquid-liquid mixtures to cause small droplets of the suspended liquid to unite, preparatory to removal from the carrier liquid.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As expected, some conclusions of the current study merely reiterate previous insights from coalescent theory.
Maximum likelihood estimation of a migration matrix and effective population sizes in subpopulations using a coalescent approach.
FST]) and M (calculated from a coalescent model) for populations of Metabetaeus lohena across the Hawaiian Islands.
reflected and stopped, reflected, coalescent, coalescent and reflected BM.
The coalescent in a continuous, finite, linear population.
Examples include low-VOC coalescents that enhance film formation and improve gloss, scrub, and blocking resistance and products with lower carbon footprints that are prepared from biorenewable feedstocks.
Our Optifilm coalescent and open time additives keep you ahead of VOC regulations and customer requirements without falling behind in performance.
Origin and diversity of novel avian influenza A H7N9 viruses causing human infection: phylogenetic, structural and coalescent analyses.
This synthesis offers a brief technical overview and history so readers can locate their own current level of knowledge in this rapidly changing fields, then contributors of the remaining papers describe linkage disequilibrium maps (LDMAPs) and location databases, construction of high-resolution LDMAPs for the human genome, linkage disequilibrium as a tool for detecting signatures of natural selections, the genetic basis of complex traits, LDMAPs as tools in studying complex disease genes, LDMAPs and disease-association mapping, coalescent methods for fine-scale disease-gene mapping, family-based linkage disequilibrium tests using general pedigrees, and association studies using familial cases as an efficient strategy for identifying low-penetrating disease alleles.
Petrous apex infection and osteomyelitis may also be a result of coalescent mastoiditis and purulent middle ear infection.
But the interest in doing so is limited, as there may be a million completely different coalescent trees for different parts of the genome.
In this article we propose a new maximum-likelihood estimator of population divergence time based on the coalescent model (Kingman 1982) with no mutation.