coast

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coast,

land bordering an ocean or other large body of water. The line of contact between the land and water surfaces is called the shoreline. It fluctuates with the waves and tides. Sometimes the terms coast and shore are used synonymously, but often shore is interpreted to mean only the zone between the shorelines at high tide and low tide, and coast indicates a strip of land of indefinite width landward of the shore. Classically, coasts have been designated as submergent if they resulted from a rise in the relative sea level and emergent if they resulted from a decline. Young submergent coasts usually are irregular and have deep water offshore and many good harbors, either bays or estuaries. Much of the coast of New England and most of the Atlantic coast of Europe are young submergent coasts according to this classification scheme. Gradually the submergent coast, subjected to erosive attacks of the ocean and other agents, becomes mature. Headlands are worn back to form cliffs, at the base of which deposits of eroded material accumulate as fringing beaches; spits and bars also grow up from material that is carried by currents and deposited in deeper water. The shoreline is called mature when it is smooth, the headlands having been cut away and the bays either filled up or closed off by spits. Emergent shorelines usually have shallow water for some distance offshore. Such shorelines are found along the Atlantic coast of the SE United States and along part of the coast of Argentina, near the Río de la Plata. This classification system does not adequately describe many coasts, partly because many of them exhibit features of both submergence and emergence. Because of these and other problems a classification system that is based on the most recent and predominant geologic agent forming the coast has become popular. Under this scheme, there are essentially two major types of coasts. Primary coasts are youthful coasts formed where the sea rests against a land mass whose topography was formed by terrestrial agents. These coasts include land erosion coasts (Maine), volcanic coasts (Hawaii), deposition coasts (Nile Delta coast), and fault coasts (Red Sea). Secondary coasts are formed chiefly and most recently by marine agents, and may even be primary coasts that have been severely modified by wave action. These coasts include wave erosion coasts, marine deposition coasts, and coasts built by organisms (reefs and mangrove coasts). The nature of the coastline of a country or a state is an important factor in its economic development because it relates to defense, fishing, recreation, and overseas commerce.

Bibliography

See C. A. M. King, Beaches and Coasts (2d ed. 1972).

COAST

(kohst) An optical interferometer at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory.

coast

[kōst]
(engineering)
A memory feature on a radar which, when activated, causes the range and angle systems to continue to move in the same direction and at the same speed as that required to track an original target.
(geography)
The general region of indefinite width that extends from the sea inland to the first major change in terrain features.

coast

1. 
a. the line or zone where the land meets the sea or some other large expanse of water
b. (in combination): coastland
2. US
a. a slope down which a sledge may slide
b. the act or an instance of sliding down a slope

COAST

References in periodicals archive ?
Federal agencies usually regulate separately each industrial sector in marine and coastal zones--if sectors are regulated at all.
This has been a long struggle at Coastal Berry,'' UFW spokesman Marc Grossman said Tuesday.
This habitat loss in turn brought the sharp decline of the local fisheries, mounting soil and water pollution, and the displacement of thousands of traditional coastal people, mainly farmers and fishers.
By calculating the ratio of stable carbon isotopes in a wide array of coastal and inland foods, they found that a marine-based diet has an isotope "signature" substantially different from a land-based one.
For example, non-point source nutrient pollution from coastal watersheds is a major problem, that has affected more than 60% of coastal rivers and bays (Howarth et al.
Offshore charges about $100 for each of five full-day lessons for its combined Basic Keelboat and Basic Coastal Cruising certifications.
Coastal is the holding company for, and owns 100 percent of the voting stock of, Coastal Banc, a Texas-chartered, federally insured savings bank headquartered in Houston.
If you had 5 minutes to explain to a client the basics of the current status of coastal and maritime security issues, how would you articulate it?
New approaches and collaborations are required if we are to understand and resolve the large-scale environmental and public health problems facing the United States' predominantly coastal population.
Greene said she began coordinating the project five years ago as a way to bring a local angle to the annual coastal cleanup event.
Bob Foster is an outstanding marketer and we are pleased that he has chosen to keep these stores in the Coastal family as branded locations," said Gene Stout, vice president of Coastal Refining & Marketing, Inc.
The sale of our controlling interest in Coastal Sunbelt Produce and ECFC represents the next logical step in the evolution of our companies and the final transition of our companies to their management teams," said Coastal Sunbelt and ECFC co-founder Paul Lebling.

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