cockney

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cockney

1. a native of London, esp of the working class born in the East End, speaking a characteristic dialect of English. Traditionally defined as someone born within the sound of the bells of St. Mary-le-Bow church
2. Austral a young snapper fish

Cockney

Bow Bells
famous bell in East End of London; “only one who is born within the bell’s sound is a true Cockney.” [Br. Hist.: NCE, 347]
Doolittle, Eliza
Cockney girl taught by professor to imitate aristocracy. [Br. Lit.: Pygmalion]
Weller, Tony and Samuel
father and son, coachman and bootblack, with colorful lingo. [Br. Lit.: Dickens Pickwick Papers]
References in periodicals archive ?
I don't know what we are going to do with a lack of Cockneys.
The Cockney accent was stronger in viewers who had become attached to their favourite Albert Square characters.
It is true that while the rhyming slang word 'brassic' is derived from 'boracic lint', the most accurate phonetic spelling of how the Cockneys choose to pronounce it is in fact 'brassic'.
And there are no maternity wards within hearing distance, which means this generation of young Cockneys could be the last.
Cockney rhyming slang is no longer the preserve of cockneys.
Each group kept its own language and we cockneys were quite shut off from them.
It was a pair of ageing, bearded cockneys armed with a piano and guitar.
We are not all Cockneys, but we all pay the licence fee.
Cockney night went down a treat with the locals, them being Cockneys.
They are called Cockneys (an ancient nickname for cheeky folk, meaning "cock's eggs"), and this way of talking is called Cockney rhyming slang.
Thirty years ago when Northerners followed their team to the capital they'd be greeted with Cockneys screaming "Loadsamoney" at them as they mocked their inabilty to spend any "wonga".
The Daily Star quoted Redknapp , 63, as saying: "It's only us Cockneys that know.