coeliac disease


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coeliac disease

a chronic intestinal disorder of young children caused by sensitivity to the protein gliadin contained in the gluten of cereals, characterized by distention of the abdomen and frothy and pale foul-smelling stools
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The Coeliac Society of New Zealand, established in 1973, promotes the welfare of adults and children diagnosed with coeliac disease.
National charity Coeliac UK say there has been a four-fold increase in the rate of diagnosed cases of coeliac disease in the UK over the past two decades.
The data also suggests that coeliac disease is made up of hundreds of genetic risk factors, we can have a good guess at nearly half of the genetic risk at present," van Heel added.
WHEN mother-of-two Melanie Evans was diagnosed with coeliac disease, it came as a huge relief finally to have an explanation for feeling so ill and losing weight at an alarming rate.
Coeliac disease, caused by a gluten intolerance which inflames the intestine, affects one in 100 people across the country.
Key words: coeliac disease, diet, gluten-free diet, nutrition.
Dietary Specials, the UK's favourite gluten and wheat free food, has launched a lifestyle club to support the 1 in 100 people in the UK who may have coeliac disease.
To be eligible, patients must have a clinically confirmed diagnosis of coeliac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, live in Scotland and be registered as an NHS patient with a GP practice.
Eve, 25, was diagnosed with coeliac disease, an auto-immune condition, after months of suffering painful bloating, upset stomachs, weight loss and extreme fatigue.
Six months ago, my husband was diagnosed as having coeliac disease.
A FORMER headteacher who was forced to quit her job after years of suffering undiagnosed coeliac disease is hoping to improve understanding of the condition.
But for people with coeliac disease, avoiding gluten - a protein in wheat, barley and rye that's found in foods containing flour, and a prominent feature in most breads, pastas, cereals, pastries, cakes and biscuits - is not a lifestyle choice but a medical necessity.