coercion

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coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
Eighteen percent reported having experienced coerced sex prior to Wave 1, and 13% said they had been coerced between the two surveys.
Most were rooted in the bill's 72-hour waiting period for women who say they are being coerced into seeking the procedure.
Table 2 shows the cumulative frequency distribution for adolescent males and females (and both groups combined) who had, and those who had not, engaged in sexual intercourse by the end of the 18-year wave, and whether their first sexual experience was coerced.
We still believe that she was coerced into it' MUM DEBBIE
The complaint alleges specifically that Gerawan interfered and coerced employees in the exercise of their rights by undermining the United Farm Workers' ability to represent employees and by directly and indirectly supporting the effort to decertify the union.
And he taught all who read his story that the system of coerced remorse is a nonsense.
Effectiveness of coerced addiction treatment (alternative consequences): A review of the clinical research.
Accordingly, men who feel guilty about their own reluctance may have more difficulty offering effective resistance, and, as a consequence, are more vulnerable to being coerced into sexual activity.
Although "almost half" of the individuals came to agree that coerced eating-disorders treatment was justified, I find it irresponsible that the study seemingly ignored the identification of potentially long-lasting negative effects on more than half of coerced clients ("Starved for Assistance: Coercion finds a place in the treatment of two eating disorders," SN: 1/20/07p.
The Iraqi convict claimed that some policemen cursed his parents and coerced him to admit.
I joined the rally both times and NO ONE coerced me to do so.