coercion


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coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
STAA provides whistleblower protection for drivers who report coercion complaints under this Final Rule and are then retaliated against by their employer.
KEY WORDS: Pornography, sexually explicit material, sexual coercion, sex drive, Confluence Model
5-8] Adverse health consequences of sexual coercion among young people have been reported from diverse settings in Latin America, Africa and South Asia; these include self-destructive behaviours such as unprotected sex, non-use of condoms and early non-consensual sexual intercourse.
The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: What constitutes coercion in family planning policy and program management and how do we use lessons of the past to prevent future instances of coercion?
The second count, coercion of a public servant, is a third-degree felony.
Despite the fact that Kentucky officials expressly denied in the settlement that neither Kentucky nor Sunrise had committed any wrongdoing, Sunrise claims that by accepting the settlement, Kentucky tacitly agreed that religious coercion occurred.
Strategic coercion is a strategy that aims to apply the full gamut of national power instruments--military, diplomatic, economic, political, etc , to either dissuade an opponent from taking an undesirable course of action, or to stop and undo an undesirable course of action already taken, by making the costs of said actions exceed the benefits of pursuing them.
Conversely, if the decision to fast is made free of disability or coercion, the Declaration of Malta bars forced feeding as unethical.
President Barack Obama's nominee for the assistant secretary of state for East Asia and the Pacific, Daniel Russel, said Thursday the United States is strongly opposed to China's coercion over territorial disputes in the East and South China Seas.
MINISTERS are poised to scrap the marital coercion defence at the heart of the Vicky Pryce trial.
Obstetricians and gynecologists should routinely teenagers and women during annual, new-patient, and obstetric visits for sexual and reproductive coercion, according to a new committee opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
His analysis contrasts Poland as having developed into a "contractual state" where the power resources of the old regime were redistributed and reconsolidated, and the boundary lines between state society regarding coercion and capital were clearly marked, versus Russia as a "predatory state" with unchecked access to coercive resources, capital vulnerable to state predation, fewer constraints on political power, and a tendency towards authoritarianism.