coercion


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coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
However, demographic concerns do not override individual liberties and rights and thus cannot be used as justification for coercion.
After all, as with the Soviet and Nazi socialists, they believe that coercion is moral and just if done for the "common good," as defined by them and not by the unwilling victims of their coercion.
Coercion is coercion; rights violations are rights violations; the welfare state relies on coercive, rights-violating confiscations of wealth; and conservatives' fantasies and special pleadings to the contrary will not change these facts.
The second count, coercion of a public servant, is a third-degree felony.
Despite the fact that Kentucky officials expressly denied in the settlement that neither Kentucky nor Sunrise had committed any wrongdoing, Sunrise claims that by accepting the settlement, Kentucky tacitly agreed that religious coercion occurred.
Physicians should be aware that coercion may come from the peer group, the authorities, or others, such as family members.
Russel, who is currently the senior director for Asian affairs at the National Security Council, said in testimony at a hearing of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, "We firmly oppose coercion, whether it's military coercion or economic coercion and the threat and the use of force.
Legal expert Joshua Rozenberg said: "The defence of marital coercion is a relic of a bygone age.
The coercion can play out as contraceptive sabotage, pressure to become pregnant unwillingly, or forcing a woman to continue or end a pregnancy against her will.
Women wouldn't have a copay for screening and counseling because sexual and reproductive coercion is a subset of intimate partner violence, which is a no-copay preventive care service under the Affordable Care Act.
Hence, in order to realize duties of justice and address problems of global collective action, we need coercion.
For example, a study by Struckman-Johnson and Struckman-Johnson (1998) found that 43% of men reported having experienced some coercive incident; similarly, Russell and Oswald (2001) observed that 18% of a sample of 285 women reported having utilized sexual coercion to some extent.