coercion

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coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
Other property theories may need to be supplanted for being necessarily faulty in its base assumptions, though even these may be saved by a reformulation that takes account of action, coercion, or subjective valuations.
Presuming that the minimization of this measure is the goal of law as provider of justice, property law is then only consistent if its enforcement adds no net coercion to conflicts.
These corollaries will be supported with both the analytical framework of action as well as empirical observations of successful and lasting property regimes that minimize the use of coercion, and contentious property regimes that rely on an observable amount of unnecessary coercion.
Like most other aspects of purposeful action, whether a property regime was the result of coercion or mutual agreement is a subjective determination.
To illustrate the subjectivity of using coercion in gaining a solution, let us assume that the only property claim at issue between two parties is exclusion from a spatial location.
Both the anarchist and the "minarchist"--the defender of the "minimal state"--accept that the government's only legitimate purpose, if indeed it has one, is the prevention of private coercion.
The anarchist criticism, then, is that given this view of coercion and state power, such a justification cannot be provided coherently" (p.
Unfortunately for the unborn, in embracing the distinction between the sacred and the secular, these politicians failed to distinguish between the religious and the moral, and saw aspects of public morality as also immune to civil coercion.