coercion

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coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
As long as the assumptions about the values of actors are accurate, the action theory of property will distinguish the exact object that is claimed as property, and will offer a solution for those seeking to reduce coercion.
27) This is evident in the wide support of the right to self defense to repel coercion.
47) Note that by limiting the exercise of justice by to responding to the observed actions of others, an actor can only justly be interfered with when an act of coercion is imminent or has actually occurred.
The sole value of law is justice, and thus property law should only admit those property regimes that minimize coercion among the parties with conflicting claims.
Most accepted bases of property do indeed relate to the interaction of some actor and the physical world, and the differences in the conclusions of these theories from the action theory of property are few, but they can be clearly explained as the introduction of some form of coercion in the historical theory.
Other property theories may need to be supplanted for being necessarily faulty in its base assumptions, though even these may be saved by a reformulation that takes account of action, coercion, or subjective valuations.