coercion

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coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
He underscored that sanctions could be prone to politicization particularly as the coercive measures are inconsistent with the international law.
But the practice of coercive diplomacy came to include the use of trade and technology denial for coercive purposes as well, and Iran was one of the first applications of the concept.
The court after hearing the arguments stayed the department from any coercive action and sought reply by January 27.
2) detection of the most dangerous places in metal structure of the crane, which was investigated in our application of coercive force parameter (Starikov et al.
Drawing on Immanuel Kant's political theory, I outline two reasons the ICC's coercive authority matters for its practical and political success.
Coercive treatment in psychiatry; clinical, legal and ethical aspects.
Many years ago, Rael Jean Isaac and Erich Isaac in their book The Coercive Utopians, explained the ideological foundations of the Lester Brown's of the world who would use the coercive powers of a state or an international organization to limit human freedom in the name of the "common good.
He was responding to an article published in Al Wasat daily under the title: "Al Wefaq urges the Interior Ministry to investigate cases of coercive disappearance".
Authorities at Guantanamo dropped the chart's original title: "Communist Coercive Methods for Eliciting Individual Compliance.
Although it condemned the exploitation of underage prostitutes, trafficking and other coercive practices, its conclusion was considered a "lowest common denominator" by sex-worker activists, liberal academics and various left-wing members of the Opposition, notably openly lesbian NDP MP Libby Davies.
For over a year, the organization had been under fire from human-rights groups and many of its own members, because psychologists had been tied to coercive interrogations and abuse at Guantanamo Bay and other places.
Conflicting statements by the police and defendant regarding the presentation and waiver of Miranda warnings, requests for an attorney, the use of coercive tactics, and the mere presence of a confession expose the spectrum of issues that can arise.