coercion

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Related to coercively: Coercitive

coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
If the problem in Goldman is that the state could demand at least a limited duty to obey, in others cases the difficulty will be that the state has not coercively enforced compliance with the law.
Until we change our attitudes, become willing to spend our tax dollars and become willing to coercively intrude in these folk's lives, those populations will continue to grow.
Although defendants Pageau and Doherty knew that Nga was only 16 years old, that she was distraught as a result of the death of her child and that she had been coercively detained for interrogation, they not only failed to provide Nga with an opportunity to consult either with her mother, an interested adult or an attorney before attempting to secure from her a waiver of her Miranda rights, they actively worked to prevent such consultation," she said in her federal complaint.
Part I of Kant's text, his "Doctrine of Right" [Rechtstlehre], sets forth coercively enforceable principles of conduct and presents us with notions for the peaceful co-existence of nation states.
The currency "Riyal" was one of Currenciesland's inhabitants, and "he" suffered before the Dollar what other currencies suffered, as he linked himself or has been coercively linked to the Dollar in its ups and downs.
For the incentive reasons considered in the standard literature on the subject (Tannehill and Tannehill 1970; Rothbard 1973; Molinari [1849] 1977; Friedman [1973] 1989), it is unlikely that the arrangements in question would allow for the appearance of arbitration and protection agencies that would actively try to hamper entrepreneurship by coercively meddling with business projects that involve no initiation of aggression against nonaggressors.
6) It was, and remains, unique in the Western democratic world in that it establishes a system ('Special Powers Regime') whereby an intelligence agency may coercively question and detain a non-suspect citizen.
Moreover, because chaplains are outside the chain of command, they are less likely than commanders to be perceived as coercively advancing religion.
The state's responsibility to maintain an order of justice will nevertheless occasionally necessitate such intervention, precisely because failure to act coercively against spousal abuse may contribute to a deterioration of the public order essential for a political community's common good.
377A deals with child molestation and read as 'whoever molests a child under the age of minority deceitfully, coercively or by providing inducement and commits unnatural or carnal intercourse against the order of nature, as the case may be, shall be punished with death or not less than rupees five hindered thousand which shall be paid to the victim'.
Moreover, Washington's policy must create an environment in which a rising China is never tempted to use its growing power coercively -- within or outside the region.
Airpower can deliver force or coercively threaten the use of force in novel ways that deserve emphasis in the joint environment.