coercion

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coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
There are also substantial indications that reliance on confessions as strong indicators of guilt can lead to wrongful convictions where the accused turned out to be innocent, even when there is awareness of coerciveness or contradictory evidence.
Moreover, the distinction between inactivity and activity is unresponsive to the very concerns about differences in coerciveness that purport to justify it.
Themes of gender, race, religion, sexuality and ethnicity have been used to dispute the centrality of the idea of the nation in postcolonial literatures and to contest what these critics see as the coerciveness of the political desire for nationhood.
As Great Gram describes, both Corregidora and his wife exerted sexual claims over her, and the violence and coerciveness of these relationships is reproduced in the sexual or sexualized relationships between women that Jones depicts.
This is the same criticism that might be directed against America's Founding Fathers, but Botwinick says that Oakeshott's attempted solution--like theirs--is to essentially leave this to the private sphere so as to "minimize one major locus of coerciveness in society.
EU policy makers have responded to critiques of the inflexibility and coerciveness of EU regulation by repeatedly promising to make EU governance simpler, more flexible, and less formal.
Various researchers have used directed-relationship items to measure familial justice and trust (Delsing, Oud, De Bruyn, & van Aken, 2003), relationship-specific anxiety (Cook, 2000), self-reported coerciveness (Cook, 1994), relationship-specific acquiescence (Cook, 1993), and emotional support (Branje, van Aken, & van Lieshout, 2002).
I'm not sure if this is a victory for Bloom or for freedom of thought or for Falstaff or simply testifies to the coerciveness of my own love of Bloom's reading, but by the time they write their papers on the play, only a few (but thankfully, usually a few) dare to reject Falstaff.
I stay because of our new San Francisco auxiliary, Bishop Robert McElroy--a nurturing pastor who has written eloquently of the unintended consequences of the denial of Communion: the perception of coerciveness, the identification of abortion as a sectarian Catholic effort, and the diminishment of the full range and impact of the church's social teaching.
A government's coerciveness, its capacity to protect itself, and its citizens' ability to mobilize against it are the three key factors in determining how vulnerable a country may be to civic violence.
Their success occurs from discovering and connecting, rather than control and coerciveness.
The speech provides early evidence of what Carpenter calls Woodhull's "striking conflation between a call for free choice in sexuality and the coerciveness of eugenics, in which individuals are obligated to sacrifice individual needs to the 'greater good?