coevolution

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coevolution

[¦kō‚ev·ə′lü·shən]
(evolution)
An evolutionary pattern based on the interaction among major groups or organisms with an obvious ecological relationship; for example, plant and plant-eater, flower and pollinator.
References in periodicals archive ?
won the individual category and a $3,000 college scholarship for his project, titled Bayesian Reconstruction of Coevolutionary Histories.
This would account not only for ecosystems and all of their complexity, but also coevolutionary systems or evosystems--all parts of the ultimate reality we face.
Invasion success might depend on past coevolutionary interactions (Glynn & Herms 2004; Parker et al, 2006a, 2006b; Desurmont et al.
hunteria is interacting with its prey from a coevolutionary perspective.
While over the years there has been much debate and challenge concerning these rules, and to establish a concrete mechanism for the companion 'wobble hypothesis', we outline here several scenarios from the point of view of coevolutionary rate distortion dynamics in graphs that represent 'robustness' while admitting 'meaningful' signalling paths which are susceptible to vocabulary enrichment, and furthermore, give rise to structure preserving patterns that evolve towards optimizing error-correction.
2006) have argued that variation in the strength of coevolutionary interactions results in evolutionary hot and cold spots, resulting in local population differentiation and speciation.
Although it is rooted in biology, the coevolutionary principle has emerged in other domains (Norgaard, 1984; Sanderson, 1990).
It is within this coevolutionary context that both hosts and parasites are running (evolving) as fast as they can just to stay in the same place.
not coevolutionary patterns, determine NiV strain diversity in reservoir hosts.
Scroll down to "The genetic basis of a plant-insect coevolutionary key innovation.
A classic "escape and radiation" coevolutionary model of host shifts is examined in moths of the genus Depressaria Haworth 1811 that feed on plants of varied toxicity.