cognate


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cognate

related by blood or descended from a common maternal ancestor

cognate

[‚käg‚nāt]
(geology)
Pertaining to contemporaneous fractures in a system with regard to time of origin and deformational type.
References in periodicals archive ?
The studies that focus on cognate recognition point to the fact that even though a precise definition of cognates is warranted to fine-tuned research objectives about this topic, there is no consensus on the definition of this term in the literature (Friel & Keninson, 2001: 251; de Bot: 2004: 19).
Cognate was co-founded by the father-son team of Jess and Bennett Collen, both Boston College graduates.
1985; Halliday 1987; Levin 1993; Mittwoch 1998; Kuno and Takami 2004) that considers that cognate objects are those noun phrases that have as their head a noun either morphologically or semantically related to the verb of the sentence:
53): "I used the term DI-ODES to describe 'poems' made from pairs of short and long vowels of a word, and I used them together, singly or in groups, as poems, phrases, cognates, etc.
Because many of the words we associate with academic English have Greco-Roman roots, it is common to find many cognates between these academic English words and more common words in other Romance languages, such as Spanish.
The etymology of each word in Turkish language will be extracted and compared with its counterpart in Urdu language in order to contrast the origins of both terms and verify whether in fact they are loanwords received from the same language directly they have been received through another language or rather the terms are cognates.
In this cognate set one can also include MariE lewe, MariW liwa warm , MariE lewe-, MariW liwe- become warm, thaw , as hesitatingly suggested by UEW (685).
1 Estonian stem, which has a cognate in Mari (pistma 'to prick'), is an old derivation from another Finno-Maric stem, represented by Estonian pusima (5)).
s corpus selection may be considered potential cognate candidates in the vocabulary of the Croatian speakers of Global English and they might experience a similar future of integration into the language of the speakers who comprise the focus group of this study.
The researchers produced possible language trees based on estimated rates at which languages gained and lost cognates.
Here, Marwick equals 'rock' with 'berg' despite these not being cognate words.
It was also thought that, when the United States Supreme Court established the federal rule on basic guarantees set forth in the Bill of Rights to the United States Constitution, particularly in the areas of the Fourth and Fifth Amendments, state supreme courts should adopt the federal rule under cognate provisions of their state constitutions.