cognitive-behavioral therapy

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cognitive-behavioral therapy

[¦käg·nə·tiv bə¦hāv·yə·rəl ′ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
A form of psychotherapy that focuses on changing dysfunctional attitudes into more realistic and positive ones and providing new information-processing skills.
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The procurement refers to a framework agreement for mission training in basic psychotherapy education in cognitive behavioral therapy (kbt) to region vstmanland as described in the tender documents.
telehealth-based delivery of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia: a randomized controlled trial,' Sleep Medicine, February 2013, 15(2): 187-195.
Everyone interested in the future of emerging healthcare techniques majorly in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy are encouraged to attend.
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a favored treatment method for the aforementioned mental illnesses.
What to do: If you have chronic lower-back pain, give mindfulness-based stress reduction or cognitive behavioral therapy a try.
Offering brief cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective alternative," Clarke said.
Joyce-Beaulieu and Sulkowski wrote Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in K-12 School Settings: A Practitioner's Toolkit to provide school social workers, school psychologists, and school counselors with practical strategies for implementing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions in the K-12 school setting.
The schedule for the dual diagnosis track has been rearranged to allow for more specific programming, including sessions with behavioral specialists who provide cognitive behavioral therapy, and other tools like behavioral activation and exposure and response prevention.
The basic assumption of cognitive behavioral therapy is that the processes of learning have great roles in creating and surviving addiction and drug dependency.
Smokers who had failed many attempts to drop the habit did so after a carefully controlled and monitored use of psilocybin, the active hallucinogenic agent in so-called "magic mushrooms," in the context of a cognitive behavioral therapy treatment program, report researchers at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.
The test also predicts who will benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy, offering the opportunity for more effective, individualized therapy.
Hunter (clinical health psychology, King's College London, UK) and Smith, a clinical psychologist who specializes in helping people manage physical health conditions through cognitive behavioral therapy, help women going through menopause manage the symptoms of hot flashes, night sweats, stress, and sleep problems using a four-week cognitive behavioral therapy program as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy.

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