cognomen


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cognomen

(originally) an ancient Roman's third name or nickname, which later became his family name
References in periodicals archive ?
The clerk demurred against embalming in flowers this somewhat striking cognomen, on the ground that the feelings of the family might be hurt.
The full tripartite names of the two consuls, consisting of praenomen, nomen, and cognomen, are Gaius Rufius Geminus (Paulys Real-Encyclopadie VII [1912]: 208) and Lucius Rubellius Geminus (ibid.
83) Stultitia alludes to it in her praise of folly, saying: "Those Hollanders of mine -- and why shouldn't I call them mine, since they worship me so zealously that they have earned thereby a widely used epithet" (Hollandi mei -- cur enim non meos appellem vsqueadeo studiosos mei cultores, vt inde vulgo cognomen emeruerint?
His cognomen he derived from English Hole and cot (i.
19) The Latin terms used are nomen et cognomen, patria, aetas, vires, tempus societatis, tempus studiorum, ministeria, and gradus.
Appel, "Betzemer: A Nineteenth Century Cognomen for the Irish," American Speech 38 (Dec.
Generally speaking, the Anti-faction (hereafter called the "Aunties" -- though the cognomen is not original with me) has been rather forceful in seeing this aid to worship as anything but.
Now, flying in the face of that conventional, maternal wisdom comes a new entertainment software development group wearing that dangerous cognomen like a badge of honor
It may be significant that Aldridge did not drop this cognate cognomen until the real Kean collapsed while performing Othello at Covent Garden in March of 1833, just a few weeks before the "African Roscius" was invited to London to play the same role in the same theater.
On the strength of Akiba's interpretation, Ben Koziba was given the cognomen Bar Kokhba.
One could conjecture that Oedipus was encouraged as a youth to accept such creative, and more favorable, renderings of his name by parents uncomfortable with all that the cognomen "Swellfoot" slanderously implied: abandonment, exposure, and adoption.
1 (on not declining the cognomen 'Nero' given to him by the crowds).