coil

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coil:

see inductorinductor,
electric device consisting of one or more turns of wire and typically having two terminals. An inductor is usually connected into a circuit in order to raise the inductance to a desired value.
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; solenoidsolenoid
, device made of a long wire that has been wound many times into a tightly packed coil; it has the shape of a long cylinder. If current is sent through a solenoid made of insulated wire and having a length much greater than its diameter, a uniform magnetic field will be
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.

Coil

One or more turns of wire used to introduce inductance into an electric circuit. At power line and audio frequencies a coil has a large number of turns of insulated wire wound close together on a form made of insulating material, with a closed iron core passing through the center of the coil. This is commonly called a choke and is used to pass direct current while offering high opposition to alternating current.

At higher frequencies a coil may have a powdered iron core or no core at all. The electrical size of a coil is called inductance and is expressed in henries or millihenries. In addition to the resistance of the wire, a coil offers an opposition to alternating current, called reactance, expressed in ohms. The reactance of a coil increases with frequency. See Inductor

coil

[kȯil]
(control systems)
Any discrete and logical result that can be transmitted as output by a programmable controller.
(electromagnetism)
A number of turns of wire used to introduce inductance into an electric circuit, to produce magnetic flux, or to react mechanically to a changing magnetic flux; in high-frequency circuits a coil may be only a fraction of a turn. Also known as electric coil; inductance; inductance coil; inductor.
(science and technology)
An arrangement of flexible material into a spiral or helix.

Coil

One or more turns of wire used to introduce inductance into an electric circuit. At power line and audio frequencies a coil has a large number of turns of insulated wire wound close together on a form made of insulating material, with a closed iron core passing through the center of the coil. This is commonly called a choke and is used to pass direct current while offering high opposition to alternating current.

At higher frequencies a coil may have a powdered iron core or no core at all. The electrical size of a coil is called inductance and is expressed in henries or millihenries. In addition to the resistance of the wire, a coil offers an opposition to alternating current, called reactance, expressed in ohms. The reactance of a coil increases with frequency. See Inductor, Reactor (electricity)

heat exchanger

A device designed to transfer heat between two physically separated fluids; generally consists of a cylindrical shell with longitudinal tubes; one fluid flows on the inside, the other on the outside.

coil

1. an electrical conductor wound into the form of a spiral, sometimes with a soft iron core, to provide inductance or a magnetic field
2. the transformer in a petrol engine that supplies the high voltage to the sparking plugs
References in classic literature ?
The tubs were full of neatly coiled line carrying a big hook each few feet; and the testing and baiting of every single hook, with the stowage of the baited line so that it should run clear when shot from the dory, was a scientific business.
The huge, snakelike body coiled and uncoiled about its prey.
The strip he coiled carefully, till it disappeared in his hand.
Then into the hollow goes the whalebone, so, tightly coiled, and another piece of blubber is fitted over the whale-bone.
For more than ten years an interminable lawsuit coiled itself closer and closer round the place, sequestering it from human habitation, and even from human approach.
With a long running-line coiled down in the stem, I rowed well out into our little cove and dropped the anchor into the water.
Maud held the turn on the windlass and coiled down while I heaved.
When I dived for him, the poor little man was lying quietly coiled up at the bottom, in a hollow of shingle, looking by many degrees smaller than I had ever seen him look before.
The rope came in tight and strained; and ring after ring was coiled upon the barrel of the windlass, and all eyes were fastened on the pit.
But, ring after ring was coiled upon the barrel of the windlass safely, and the connecting chains appeared, and finally the bucket with the two men holding on at the sides - a sight to make the head swim, and oppress the heart - and tenderly supporting between them, slung and tied within, the figure of a poor, crushed, human creature.
Go-Coil provides coiled tubing services to exploration and production companies operating in the United States onshore and offshore oil and gas markets.
Historically, most Neolithic and Bronze Age peoples produced good coiled pottery and continued to do so for large storage jars when the wheel became used for smaller repeat items; western Asia, the Mediterranean and northern China can provide some excellent examples (Hamer & Hamer, p 72).