coil

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coil:

see inductorinductor,
electric device consisting of one or more turns of wire and typically having two terminals. An inductor is usually connected into a circuit in order to raise the inductance to a desired value.
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; solenoidsolenoid
, device made of a long wire that has been wound many times into a tightly packed coil; it has the shape of a long cylinder. If current is sent through a solenoid made of insulated wire and having a length much greater than its diameter, a uniform magnetic field will be
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.

Coil

One or more turns of wire used to introduce inductance into an electric circuit. At power line and audio frequencies a coil has a large number of turns of insulated wire wound close together on a form made of insulating material, with a closed iron core passing through the center of the coil. This is commonly called a choke and is used to pass direct current while offering high opposition to alternating current.

At higher frequencies a coil may have a powdered iron core or no core at all. The electrical size of a coil is called inductance and is expressed in henries or millihenries. In addition to the resistance of the wire, a coil offers an opposition to alternating current, called reactance, expressed in ohms. The reactance of a coil increases with frequency. See Inductor

coil

[kȯil]
(control systems)
Any discrete and logical result that can be transmitted as output by a programmable controller.
(electromagnetism)
A number of turns of wire used to introduce inductance into an electric circuit, to produce magnetic flux, or to react mechanically to a changing magnetic flux; in high-frequency circuits a coil may be only a fraction of a turn. Also known as electric coil; inductance; inductance coil; inductor.
(science and technology)
An arrangement of flexible material into a spiral or helix.

Coil

One or more turns of wire used to introduce inductance into an electric circuit. At power line and audio frequencies a coil has a large number of turns of insulated wire wound close together on a form made of insulating material, with a closed iron core passing through the center of the coil. This is commonly called a choke and is used to pass direct current while offering high opposition to alternating current.

At higher frequencies a coil may have a powdered iron core or no core at all. The electrical size of a coil is called inductance and is expressed in henries or millihenries. In addition to the resistance of the wire, a coil offers an opposition to alternating current, called reactance, expressed in ohms. The reactance of a coil increases with frequency. See Inductor, Reactor (electricity)

heat exchanger

A device designed to transfer heat between two physically separated fluids; generally consists of a cylindrical shell with longitudinal tubes; one fluid flows on the inside, the other on the outside.

coil

1. an electrical conductor wound into the form of a spiral, sometimes with a soft iron core, to provide inductance or a magnetic field
2. the transformer in a petrol engine that supplies the high voltage to the sparking plugs
References in classic literature ?
I slipped my lasso from the horn of my saddle, and grasped the coil in my right hand.
They would rock to and fro, head to head, each waiting for his chance, till the beautiful, statue-like group melted in a whirl of black-and-yellow coils and struggling legs and arms, to rise up again and again.
From it he took a coil of the strongest and lightest rope, a hundred and fifty feet in length, with climbing irons, clamps, and other devices.
said Raffles, throwing coils of smoke between his smiles.
The foliage actually was hidden beneath their coils, so that the beholder might have fancied that he saw before him a new kind of tree that bore reptiles for its leaves and fruit.
Nearer and nearer she came to where Tarzan of the Apes crouched upon his limb, the coils of his long rope poised ready in his hand.
I know not," quoth Will Stutely, shaking his head doubtfully, "our master is ever rash about thrusting his finger into a boiling pot; but, for my part, I see no use in getting ourselves into mischievous coils.
The young women, with their hair magnificently swept in coils, a red flower behind the ear, sat on the doorsteps, or issued out on to balconies, while the young men ranged up and down beneath, shouting up a greeting from time to time and stopping here and there to enter into amorous talk.
Just as the coils and braids of dark-brown hair had been set free, Sir James entered the room.
Loosening this, he spread the noose upon the ground behind him, and with a quick movement of his wrist tossed the coils over one of the sharpened projections of the summit of the palisade.
He arranged the coils carefully in his left hand and the noose in his right, and then he took a position with each foot on one of two branches that lay in about the same horizontal plane and with his back pressed firmly against the stem of the tree.
At the ape-man's side swung his long grass rope--the play-thing of yesterday, the weapon of today--and as Taug charged the second time, Tarzan slipped the coils over his head and deftly shook out the sliding noose as he again nimbly eluded the ungainly beast.