cold sweat


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cold sweat

Informal a bodily reaction to fear or nervousness, characterized by chill and moist skin
References in periodicals archive ?
If you're the sort of person who comes out in a cold sweat at the prospect of putting up a curtain pole, watch and be amazed as massive concrete platforms and sections of escalator are lowered deep underground through an opening nicknamed "a molehole".
The report claimed Brits are continuing to live up to their "straight-laced, conservative stereotype", with women breaking out into a cold sweat at the thought of discussing their sex lives with men.
THE very idea of standing in front of hundreds of people, belting out a tune probably leaves most people in a cold sweat.
Ross Kemp Back on the Frontline (Sky1, 9pm) GIVEN that he still wakes in the middle of the night in a cold sweat, it's surprising that Ross Kemp is heading back to the danger-zone.
SUNDAY'S Spanish Grand Prix result will have had many of the team bosses in a cold sweat.
I still wake up sometimes in a cold sweat, wondering if I've got enough.
It brings me out in a real cold sweat - and not a James Brown-style cold sweat either.
We ought to have some basic understanding of how math in general, and calculus in particular, fits into our cultural framework, and be able to look at a rudimentary equation without breaking into a cold sweat.
It has actually brought me out into CSWG - cold sweat with goosebumps - on more than one occasion.
Other signs: These may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.
If you start getting hot under the collar the minute you enter the lingerie department, or if basques, balconettes and bustiers bring you out in a cold sweat, help is at hand.