cold-conductor effect

cold-conductor effect

[¦kōld kən′dək·tər i‚fekt]
(solid-state physics)
A sudden increase in resistivity, up to seven orders of magnitude, as the temperature increases over a narrow range; observed in certain semiconducting materials, particularly ferroelectric titanate ceramics.