collage


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collage

(kəläzh`, kō–) [Fr.,=pasting], technique in art consisting of cutting and pasting natural or manufactured materials to a painted or unpainted surface—hence, a work of art in this medium. The art of collage was initiated in 1912 when Picasso pasted a section of commercially printed oilcloth to his cubist painting, Still Life with Chair Caning (Mus. of Modern Art, New York City). Collage elements appear in works by Gris, Braque, Malevich, Dove, and the futurist artists. A basic means of Dada and surrealist art, it was used by Arp, Schwitters, and Ernst. Collage is related to the newer art of assemblage, in which the traditional painted canvas has been abandoned in favor of the assembling of bits of material, which are sometimes additionally painted or carved.

Bibliography

See studies by H. Janis and R. Blesh (rev. ed. 1967), H. Wescher (1968, tr. 1971), N. Laliberté (1972), G. F. Brommer (1978), B. French (1978), and John and Joan Digby (1987).

collage

An artistic composition of often diverse materials and objects in unlikely or unexpected juxtaposition, which are pasted over a surface; often with unifying lines and color.
See also: Design drawing

Collage

 

in the fine arts, a technique involving the pasting of materials onto a surface from which they differ in color and texture. A work executed entirely by this method is also a collage. The technique is used primarily in the graphic arts to increase the emotional impact of the work’s texture and of unusual combinations of various materials. Cubists, futurists, and dadaists introduced collage as a formal experiment; they affixed pieces of fabrics, chips of wood, and bits of newspaper, photographs, and wallpaper to the canvas.

REFERENCE

Wescher, H. Die Collage: Geschichte eines künstlerischen Ausdrucksmittels. Cologne [1968.]

collage

[kə′läzh]
(graphic arts)
A composition consisting of paper, cloth, wood, photographs, and so on, pasted together to form a texture or pattern.

collage

1. an art form in which compositions are made out of pieces of paper, cloth, photographs, and other miscellaneous objects, juxtaposed and pasted on a dry ground
2. any work, such as a piece of music, created by combining unrelated styles
References in periodicals archive ?
Collage artists who are known for their photomontages include Romare Bearden, Annell Livingston, and Shirley Moskowitz.
Each of these artists had a different style but, at some point in their careers, they all created collages with a theme my students could relate to.
The students eagerly launched into their own collages, under some gentle guidance from Jones.
Pennsylvania House showed a more opulent collage look on a sofa covered in a deep taupe chenille satin stripe and ground, with accent pillows in a houndstooth damask and satin stripe in subdued burgundy, and a medallion tapestry in shades of both.
So he set out to make a photo collage similar to those displayed in museums or occasionally on commercials - thousands of pictures up close, one larger picture from a distance.
On scene Rescue 1122 incident commander at Viqar-un-Nisa collage Ms.
The word collage comes from the French word "coller" meaning to paste or glue.
But the manner in which collage can make meaning--in an atmosphere now dense in remixes, mash-ups, and shuffles--will be very different than it was in times of crisis past.
In the collage, a man and a woman are lying on the ground.
After several brief introductory chapters defining collage and related terms, along with a discussion of sources for collage materials, the authors move directly into the presentation of forty-seven step-by-step projects.
Consumers present their personal feelings about milk both verbally and physically by creating a collage using our proprietary patent-pending eCollage platform.