collage

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collage

(kəläzh`, kō–) [Fr.,=pasting], technique in art consisting of cutting and pasting natural or manufactured materials to a painted or unpainted surface—hence, a work of art in this medium. The art of collage was initiated in 1912 when Picasso pasted a section of commercially printed oilcloth to his cubist painting, Still Life with Chair Caning (Mus. of Modern Art, New York City). Collage elements appear in works by Gris, Braque, Malevich, Dove, and the futurist artists. A basic means of Dada and surrealist art, it was used by Arp, Schwitters, and Ernst. Collage is related to the newer art of assemblage, in which the traditional painted canvas has been abandoned in favor of the assembling of bits of material, which are sometimes additionally painted or carved.

Bibliography

See studies by H. Janis and R. Blesh (rev. ed. 1967), H. Wescher (1968, tr. 1971), N. Laliberté (1972), G. F. Brommer (1978), B. French (1978), and John and Joan Digby (1987).

collage

An artistic composition of often diverse materials and objects in unlikely or unexpected juxtaposition, which are pasted over a surface; often with unifying lines and color.
See also: Design drawing

Collage

 

in the fine arts, a technique involving the pasting of materials onto a surface from which they differ in color and texture. A work executed entirely by this method is also a collage. The technique is used primarily in the graphic arts to increase the emotional impact of the work’s texture and of unusual combinations of various materials. Cubists, futurists, and dadaists introduced collage as a formal experiment; they affixed pieces of fabrics, chips of wood, and bits of newspaper, photographs, and wallpaper to the canvas.

REFERENCE

Wescher, H. Die Collage: Geschichte eines künstlerischen Ausdrucksmittels. Cologne [1968.]

collage

[kə′läzh]
(graphic arts)
A composition consisting of paper, cloth, wood, photographs, and so on, pasted together to form a texture or pattern.

collage

1. an art form in which compositions are made out of pieces of paper, cloth, photographs, and other miscellaneous objects, juxtaposed and pasted on a dry ground
2. any work, such as a piece of music, created by combining unrelated styles
References in periodicals archive ?
Yoko Ono is another example of recent artists employing collagist strategies in the context of sequential flux.
In this exuberant presentation by curator Robert Storr, Reinhardt appeared as a savvy designer and mercurial wit, a collagist who, equipped with a plentiful harvest of pulp illustration, could pillory Nazis and Greenwich Village developers with equal venom.
Whether there is an "individual" beyond the obvious human person inside his or her envelope of skin has now become one of the central questions of contemporary literary art, so fundamental to what we recognize as poetry in the English language that the collagist, dissociative, or fragmentary mode of constructing a poem has become a new formula.
Punk collagist and performance artist Linder, whose art-world influence has grown considerably in recent years, has created Forgetful Green (2010) in which she promises a 'compressed history of glamour' as several characters from a recent performance are captured amid the fields of rose growers Cants of Colchester.
Painter, printmaker, collagist and film-maker, his art covers a wide range of subjects.
His method is that of the collagist, and it seems no coincidence that he has published a book of essays and poems on the collage artist Joseph Cornell (see Piotr Florczyk, "Praising the Riddle," WLT 81.
carefully torn by the collagist precisely to fit this corner.
One of the greatest practitioners of collage art for popular advantage--that is, to tell the truth--was the German collagist Heartfield, who actually pulled Hitler's tail during the waning years of democracy in Germany.
Ryoji Ikeda's electronic score, with selections titled "Space," "C," and "Time," was two parts minimalist to one part collagist.
She's 30-something,' Britain's last surviving Surrealist painter, collagist and object-maker says vaguely.
Twice, Burns has used pictures by the master collagist, Ernst, as covers for his books.
They do breathe something of the atmosphere of the 1950s, when Strand received his artistic education--it is easy to see affinities with the work of such now-underrated artists as James Brooks, Conrad Marca-Relli, or Esteban Vicente, not to mention the premier collagist of that time and place, Anne Ryan.