collapsar


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

collapsar

[kə′lap‚sär]
(astronomy)
A black hole that forms during the gravitational collapse of a massive star.
References in periodicals archive ?
As follows from (12), in this case the surface of the sphere is simultaneously both the surface of the collapsar and the surface of the breaking of the space.
This comparison allows us to consider the process of transformation of the gravitational collapsar ("black hole") into the inflational collapsar ("white hole").
It is true that OS also found that in this limit there is a region inside the collapsar from which light may not be emitted, but we shall show below that this is not a real property of the model, and that it may be easily repaired so that all points of the physical space, exterior and interior, remain causally connected at all times.
it integrates over the volume of the collapsar to give
The collapsar will produce a highly luminous GRB with more infalling material to feed the black hole.
In contrast, the nearby, subenergetic GRBs probably originate from lower-mass progenitors that rotate more slowly, so the collapsar mechanism doesn't have as much accreting mass or rotation energy to power highly relativistic jets.
Two papers scheduled for an upcoming Astrophysical Journal Letters appear to support the collapsar model.
This result leads us to suggest that the signal from Sagittarius A* comes partly from the surface of the collapsar itself, and not entirely from the accretion disc, as is assumed in most current analyses.
This souped-up version of a supernova is what Woosley and Bohdan Paczynski of Princeton University variously call a collapsar or hypernova.
This classification of stars results in three main types: regular stars (covering white dwarfs to super-giants) covered in Chapter 2, of which Wolf-Rayet stars are a subtype, neutron stars and pulsars, covered in Chapter 4 and collapsars (i.
The collapsar model can fit this requirement; a superdense disk around the spinning black hole might form and re-form irregularly as matter from the explosion falls back inward.
Obviously, only an extremely dense cosmic body can completely be located under its gravitational radius, thus consisting a gravitational collapsar (black hole).