peccary

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Related to collared peccaries: javelina, Tayassu tajacu, Tayassuidae, Tayassu pecari, Pecari tajacu, Chacoan Peccary

peccary

(pĕk`ərē), small wild pig, genus Tayassu, the only pig native to the Americas. Although similar in appearance to Old World pigs, peccaries are classified in a family of their own because of anatomical differences. Peccaries have downward-curved tusks with which they fight ferociously when threatened. They have large heads and long snouts; both sexes have scent glands on the rump. There are two peccary species. The collared peccary, or javelina, Tayassu tajacu, is the more common, ranging from the SW United States to Argentina and inhabiting many types of country, from tropical swamps to dry scrub regions. It is about 20 in. (50 cm) high at the shoulder and weighs about 50 lb (23 kg); it has grizzled gray-black hair marked with a white neck band and an erectile mane on the neck. Collared peccaries move about in small family groups, eating roots, fruits, insects, worms, and reptiles. The white-lipped peccary, T. albirostris, is found in smaller numbers in forests from S Mexico to N Argentina. Reddish brown to black, with white lips and cheeks, it is somewhat larger than the collared peccary and more predacious in its habits. White-lipped peccaries move about in large herds foraging for food and hunting small mammals. Peccaries are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Artiodactyla, family Tayassuidae.

peccary

[′pek·ə·rē]
(vertebrate zoology)
Either of two species of small piglike mammals in the genus Tayassu, composing the family Tayassuidae.

peccary

either of two piglike artiodactyl mammals, Tayassu tajacu (collared peccary) or T. albirostris (white-lipped peccary) of forests of southern North America, Central and South America: family Tayassuidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Prevalence of antileptospiral agglutinins per positive serogroup in captive collared peccaries, Peruvian Amazon, May 2003-Dec 2003 * Loreto area BIOAM (n = 27) Positive Positive reactions Max reactions Max Serogroup no.
Unlike Arizona's collared peccaries, Chacoan peccaries are mostly active during the day even during hot weather.
By comparison, if collared peccaries detect a jaguar or puma from a distance, herd members will quickly scent mark each other and then take off single file.
Size of bite for acorns of Shumard oaks by white-tailed deer was similar to the size of the acorn, whereas sizes of bites by wild boars and collared peccaries were only ca.
When consuming pods of mesquites, which do not have a shell that is easily removed, wild boars had relatively large sizes of bites and had rates of intake greater than collared peccaries and raccoons, while maintaining a rate of intake similar to white-tailed deer.
Based on size of bite and direct observation, wild boars were less selective in removing shells from acorns of live oaks than were collared peccaries and raccoons.
Overall, collared peccaries tended to have lower rates of bites than other species.
Wild boars, white-tailed deer, collared peccaries, and raccoons spent time chewing or removing shells from acorns, whereas wild turkeys were not subject to mastication.
The Cr-marked fiber was offered to wild boars, white-tailed deer, and collared peccaries with a small amount of whole corn and honey to encourage consumption.
Wild boars had nearly three times greater intakes of dry matter and digestible energy than collared peccaries (Table 2).
White-tailed deer, wild boars, and collared peccaries had digestibilities of neutral-detergent fiber similar to one another and more than two times greater than turkeys, raccoons, and southern plains woodrats.
07), with collared peccaries having 10% greater digestibility of crude protein than raccoons.