collocation

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collocation

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10) The repeated use of certain reporting verbs with the same character fits in with Dickens's collocational style, analysed by Masahiro Hori (2004).
Dynamic exploration of textual material starting from the extracted terminology, extraction of collocational patterns for the terms of interest, etc.
In order to find out how the competing pairs of adjectives are synonymous, we have conducted a fairly rough quantitative analysis of their collocational behaviour in the corpora of four languages.
From a formal point of view, what I mean is is not a main clause, but can be described as a collocational frame (Aijmer 1996:27) or construction (Traugott and Trousdale 2013: 11) (see Figure 1.
Neither does the collocational method indicate 'choose', because the grammatical collocations *appoint among/from are illformed, while choose, pick (out) and select can be followed by the prepositions among and from.
Michael Lewis as cited in Martynska [17] defines collocation as a subcategory of multi-word items, made up of individual words which habitually co-occur and can be found free- fixed collocational continuum.
Skrzypek, Phonological short-term memory and L2 collocational development in adult learners, EUROSLA Yearbook, London, 2009.
Furthermore, in terms of semantic features, Ayuninjam mentions that there are verbs which express aspectual meanings but do not have overt grammatical markers, and that selectional restrictions in these features are analogous to collocational restrictions, although some are semantic and others are formal (1998:334-335).
Collocation, as the tendency of at least two lexical items to co-occur in a language, can serve as a source of lexical cohesion since collocational relationship is one of the factors on which we build our expectations of what is to come next' (Halliday and Hasan, 1976: 333), facilitating thus our more rapid understanding (and even translation) of the text.
Teachers of foreign languages are familiar with the concept of communicative competence, but the relatively new concept of collocational competence gains ground as any analysis of students' speech or writing shows a lack of this collocational competence.
With regard to semantic errors in lexis, there are two main types: confusion of sense relations (a word being used in contexts where a similar word should be used) and collocational errors (the choice of a word to accompany another is inappropriate).
Some authors also emphasize the importance of developing collocational competence of English learners based on the knowledge of specific word compatibility in a foreign language (which strongly depends on the choices and preferences of the native speakers) (Rosina 2001: 101; Gile 2009).