colloidal instability

colloidal instability

[kə′lȯid·əl in·stə‚bil·əd·ē]
(meteorology)
A property attributed to clouds, by which the particles of the cloud tend to aggregate into masses large enough to precipitate.
References in periodicals archive ?
While many analysts and educators would claim that all light-scattering immunoassays involving latex particles are based on bridging between polyvalent antigen molecules to achieve aggregate formation, the possibility of colloidal instability as the likely mechanism for aggregation still exists.
Colloidal instability of protein-coated latex particles is a well-known phenomenon [7,11,12].
All particle-enhanced immunoassay reactions are not expected to operate in this way, although one can reasonably expect that all particle-enhanced immunoprecipitation/agglutination reactions will depend to a certain degree on colloidal instability.