neck

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neck

1. the part of an organism connecting the head with the rest of the body
2. Anatomy a constricted portion of an organ or part, such as the cervix of the uterus
3. a narrow or elongated projecting strip of land; a peninsula or isthmus
4. a strait or channel
5. the part of a violin, cello, etc., that extends from the body to the tuning pegs and supports the fingerboard
6. a solid block of lava from the opening of an extinct volcano, exposed after erosion of the surrounding rock
7. Botany the upper, usually tubular, part of the archegonium of mosses, ferns, etc.
8. the length of a horse's head and neck taken as an approximate distance by which one horse beats another in a race
9. Architect the narrow band at the top of the shaft of a column between the necking and the capital, esp as used in the Tuscan order

Neck

In the Classical orders, the space between the bottom of the capital and the top of the shaft, usually marked by a sinkage, or a ring of moldings.

Neck

 

the part of the body between the head and the trunk in man and land vertebrates. The neck is responsible for the mobility of the head, permits orientation in space, and facilitates the grasping of food, defense, and attack.

The framework of the neck consists of cervical vertebrae. The neck muscles are primarily modified portions of the truncal musculature. In amniotes, a compressor of the neck has developed— a derivative of the voluntary visceral musculature. The neck contains the initial sections of the respiratory system (larynx, trachea) and digestive system (pharynx, some salivary glands, part of the esophagus), several blood vessels (for example, the carotid arteries and jugular veins) and lymphatic vessels, the thyroid and parathyroid glands, and nerves. The initial segment of the spinal cord lies in the cerebrospinal canal, enclosed by arches of the cervical vertebrae.

In amphibians, the neck is not outwardly noticeable (there is only one vertebra), and the head can move only up and down and a little to the sides. In amniotes, the cervical portion has several vertebrae, and the development of the atlas and epistropheus (axis) enables the head to bend and rotate. In birds, the number of cervical vertebrae varies from nine to 25, and the combination of their movements makes it possible for some birds to rotate their heads 270° in one direction. In mammals, the cervical portion, regardless of the length of the neck, usually contains seven vertebrae. This is also true of the whale, whose neck is not outwardly separate, and of the giraffe. In the case of secondary limitation of neck mobility, the vertebrae of the cervical segment fuse (in cetaceans, armadillos, jerboas, and some other animals).

What does it mean when you dream about a neck?

To “protect one’s neck” is to not get caught at doing something in secret or to participate in a situation where one’s actions could be condemned. Often the phrase “don’t stick your neck out” is said as an admonishment. “Necking” describes romantic physical expressions of kissing, hugging, and overt passion arising aroused from the erogenous zones in the neck.

neck

[nek]
(anatomy)
The usually constricted communicating column between the head and trunk of the vertebrate body.
(engineering)
The part of a furnace where the flame is contracted before reaching the stack.
(geography)
A narrow strip of land, especially one connecting two larger areas.
(geology)
(metallurgy)
In a tensile test, that portion of the metal at which fracture is imminent during the later stages of plastic deformation in a tensile test.
(oceanography)
The narrow band of water forming the part of a rip current where feeder currents converge and flow swiftly through the incoming breakers and out to the head.

neck

1. In the classical orders, the space between the bottom of the capital and the top of the shaft, which is marked by a sinkage or a ring of moldings.
2. A section of the branch duct that connects an air diffuser with the main supply duct.
References in periodicals archive ?
Collum spent a number of seasons deputising to Damien Sheridan, who retired last year, and rates him as highly as his opposite number this Sunday, Stephen Cluxton.
Rangers boss Walter Smith, said: "I think there was unfair pressure on Willie Collum today, but I felt he handled the game extremely well.
OFF: Collum shows Falkirk's Cregg (left) a straight red at Ibrox last week; REFFIN' HOPELESS: Willie Collum is making a habit of flashing red and yellow cards at every opportunity
Hugh Collum said: "I will have spent nearly five years with BNFL and the middle of next year will be an appropriate time for me to move aside.
Playing in front of Quincy was something that I never dreamed to be possible,'' said Collum, an accomplished blues and jazz guitarist who considers Charles one of his main inspirations.
Mr Collum praised the pounds 22 million pre-tax profit, which compared with a pounds 210 million loss in the previous year.
Mr Collum praised the pounds 22m pre-tax profit, which compared with a pounds 210m loss in the previous year.
She married Lester Collum and followed him to his army post in Tokyo, where she became an assistant to dancer/choreographer Michio Ito.
Corporal Collum leaves a wife Sharron and two children, Ellen Louise aged four, James Alexander aged two.
Devotees of the great goddess have yet to discover Vera Collum and her excavations in megalithic tombs.
Helen Liddell, minister of state at the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), held talks with Collum in the wake of the revelation of BNFL's falsification of quality control data on plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel delivered to Japan.
Spring Rock Production President and CEO, Randall Collum, says the new service was created to fill an urgent and growing need in the marketplace.