collusion

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collusion

a secret agreement between opponents at law in order to obtain a judicial decision for some wrongful or improper purpose

collusion

A secret agreement for illegal or fraudulent purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
This, of course, is very intuitive since persuasive advertising is mutually canceling and both firms would want to limit its expenditure collusively.
68, 97 (1982), which observed that "[a]t one time, exclusive dealing was arguably practiced by the major firms in [the hearing aid] market, a fact suggesting either that the practice involved efficiencies or that it was collusively adopted to block entry.
Economists have long recognized that the NCAA operates much like a cartel, acting collusively to minimize input costs and restrict output.
They had ready accomplices though in the western media that obliging and collusively played up their fake reports of heroic deeds and their charge of collusion with remnants against Pakistan.
Nast rejected that claim, saying if the lawsuit had not been collusively settled, the breast cancer drug would be priced much lower.
This is a very interesting part, because the industry has a rich history of predatory pricing, merging to monopoly, engaging in tacit collusion, and collusively suppressing any mention of health risks.
They just watched on silently, rather collusively, while the American strategists were playing their big game in the province freely and ruinously.
The second stage determined whether firms could actually behave collusively in those markets, taking into account a variety of market factors, including ease of entry.
At the time the MLB Players Association argued that such a rule curbed player salaries for the opposite reason that a leverage rule would collusively restrict club spending on player salaries [2].
The imposition of a payroll cap effectively eliminates increasing marginal costs of talent ([Delta] = 1) from the profit maximization calculus, and it thereby allows the teams of the league to collusively behave as the firm.
Knowing this, incumbent firms would appear able to raise their prices collusively without the worry of entry.