colonnade

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colonnade

(kŏlənād`), a row of columns usually supporting a roof. Colonnades were popular with the Greeks and Romans, who employed them in the stoastoa
, in ancient Greek architecture, an extended, roofed colonnade on a street or square. Early examples consisted of a simple open-fronted shed or porch with a roof sloping from the back wall to the row of columns along the front.
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 and the porticoportico
, roofed space using columns or posts, generally included between a wall and a row of columns or between two rows of columns. In Greece the stoa was a portico of the first type; in Greek temples porticoes terminated the front and rear ends of the naos—called
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; they have continued to be used throughout the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and modern times. See columncolumn,
vertical architectural support, circular or polygonal in plan. A column is generally at least four or five times as high as its diameter or width; stubbier freestanding masses of masonry are usually called piers or pillars, particularly those with a rectangular plan.
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.

Colonnade

A combination or grouping of columns paced at regular intervals, and arranged with regard to their structural or ornamental relationship to the building. They can be aligned either straight or arced in a circular pattern.

Colonnade

 

a row or rows of columns supporting a horizontal roof structure. Outdoor colonnades, which are either porticoes or galleries, are usually attached to a building to unify its isolated elements (for example, the Palladian villas). A colonnade also visually relates a building to its courtyard or square (for example, the colonnade of the Kazan Cathedral, Leningrad, 1801–11, architect A. N. Voronikhin) and its natural setting. Some colonnades are independent structures, such as the Colonnade of Apollo in Pavlovsk (1780–83, architect C. Cameron). Interior colonnades usually surround large halls, serving both to divide and unite various parts of a grand interior (for example, the colonnade in the former Catherine Hall in the Tauride Palace, Leningrad, 1783–89, architect I. E. Starov).

colonnade

[‚käl·ə′nād]
(architecture)
A series of columns placed at regular intervals.

colonnade

colonnade
A number of columns arranged in order, at intervals called intercolumniation, supporting an entablature and usually one side of a roof.

colonnade

1. a set of evenly-spaced columns
2. a row of regularly spaced trees
References in periodicals archive ?
Later, they also destroyed the triumphal arch leading to the city's main colonnaded avenue.
Browse the elegant, colonnaded designer stores, such as Gucci and Armani in the Borgo Stretto.
Groups of red-tiled houses and barns kept their distance from the classical splendour of white colonnaded buildings: a landscape totally new to him.
We were the latest to seek a retreat in the colonnaded folly amid the trees.
It features Roman paved and colonnaded streets, soaring hilltop temples and handsome theatres - all of which have been excavated from their sandy graves and restored over the last 70 years.
They showed a colonnaded palace with interiors full of frescos and antique furniture.
At the end of a colonnaded street are ruins of a very large building dedicated to their God Artemis.
So he listens to what we tell him," one remarked, and then turned back into the colonnaded ballroom to see what was for dessert.
What you see today is what was a large city of colonnaded streets, temples, churches, theatres, baths, mausoleums and tombs.
As America became colonised, louvered shutters became as much a part of the architectural landscape of the 19th century Deep South as colonnaded mansions and rolling plantations.
Inside his white colonnaded mansion, where deer, black buck and peacocks roam the lawns outside, and two stuffed lions guard his drawing room filled with crystal and gold, Sharif insists Pakistan must set about righting its decades of inequality.
Walking through the beaux arts-style structure designed by Hudson & Munsell reveals vitality even in the empty space, where in the marble and colonnaded rotunda, a stained-glass skylight and florid-plastered ceiling rise high above a bronze statue of the Three Muses holding up a globe.