colophon

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colophon

(kŏl`əfŏn') [Gr.,=finishing stroke]. Before the use of printing in Western Europe a manuscript often ended with a statement about the author, the scribe, or the illuminator. The first printed book to have a comparable concluding statement was the Mainz Psalter, crediting the printer and giving the date printed (1457) in its last paragraph. After this, a printed book commonly ended with this statement, now called a colophon. The information came to be given on the title page after c.1520. The name colophon is applied also to a printer's mark or a publisher's device on a title page or elsewhere.
References in periodicals archive ?
a colophon dated Expired Karttikadi Samvat 301 Vaisakha sukla 7 Sunday,
In Latin, additionally, there are five prose prayers, four verse prayers, a devotional accessus, a colophon, and a moral poem.
The one that appears most frequently in the colophons is "Elisabeth late wyfe to Robert Redman" (see the list of titles provided in append.
Although the moniker didn't enter the English language until Burton and Warton escorted it, the first colophon actually dates from a century and a half earlier: the German Mainz Psalter, a book of Psalms published in 1457 by Johann Fust and Peter Schoffer.
The colophon initially describes not de Worde's shop but the texts themselves: 'the prouerbes of Lydgate vpon the fall of prynces' ([B8.
According to the colophon of the Mongol text, this version was ordered by Ilayuysan Buyan-u Erke Bayayud Bayatur dai qung tayiji, a grandson of Altan Khan of the Turned, and was written down by the monk eos Irgamsu 1= Tib.
Among the few women in this period to sign their names in colophons are Caterina De Silvestro, Elisabetta Rusconi, Girolama Cartolari, and Clara Giolito de' Ferrari.
The baptism section ends at line 174, where we find the first colophon, and the masiqta follows after the large illustrated part.
After all, colophons attesting to the antique character of the scroll should elicit a degree of skepticism when the only guarantors of a rubbing's genuineness are beholden to the collector or when the colophon's rhetoric is a marvel of ambiguity.
Although the Arabic word laqab means a kind of nickname, in the context of the colophons the laqab is a clan or family name, and is often Mandaic in origin rather than Arabic.
Among the debris of the archives of the Hittite capital there have been recovered a small number of tablets that list collections of other compositions, usually cited by their colophons (sometimes abbreviated; see p.
Together with dialogue, additional rhetoric elements are introduced in the new spells, such as indications of use, declarations of efficacy, statements of invention, colophons, and titles.