color-blind


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Related to color-blind: color vision deficiency, protanopia

color-blind

[′kəl·ər ‚blīnd]
(graphic arts)
Of a photographic emulsion, sensitive only to blue, violet, and ultraviolet light.
References in periodicals archive ?
In recent years, there has been a resurgence of color-blind ideals in the legal landscape of various U.
In arguing the impotence of a worldly justice system (particularly in the South) that is incapable of protecting or serving African Americans, Chesnutt simultaneously critiques Tourgee's faith in color-blind law and Booker T.
Liberalism, of course, relies on the color-blind principle to guarantee the equality of all individuals under the law.
Katz's paintings is green or dark gray [Letters, January 2002]: Some estimate that seven out of ten males are color-blind to certain shades of certain colors.
Her most recent work is Seeing a Color-Blind Future: The Paradox of Race (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, April 1998).
Many of your articles, features and letters are color-blind and provide valuable information to anyone who reads them.
In other words, for all the illusory successes of the civil rights movement, and despite the deluded or willful belief of so many whites, including Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, that the movement resulted in a color-blind society, the nation remains a house divided--or, as other writers have put it, two nations, separate and unequal.
We have always been a color-blind and gender-blind company," said Lokey in accepting the prestigious award.
Some female squirrel monkeys can see in color, but male squirrel monkeys are normally red-green color-blind because they lack pigments in the retina that detect those wavelengths of light.
This was a color-blind decision, and the African-American community should tone done its rhetoric and practice color-blindness.
It is depressing to have my paintings reviewed by a critic who is inattentive or color-blind.
Like Martin Luther King, Fuchs began by affirming a color-blind America, in which African Americans as individuals would enjoy equal rights.