coloring agent


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coloring agent

[′kəl·ər·iŋ ‚ā·jənt]
(food engineering)
Any substance of natural origin, such as turmeric, annatto, caramel, carmine, and carotine, or a synthetic certified food color added to food to compensate for color changes during processing or to give an appetizing color.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers added an amount of turmeric typically used commercially as a coloring agent and an amount of oxygen comparable to that which would enter a sealed plastic container over a one-year storage period.
We refrain from adding any artificial flavoring or coloring agent.
It entails obtaining an oral cleaner comprising water, poloxamer 407 as a foaming agent, a sweetener, a flavoring agent, an antimicrobial agent, a preservative and a coloring agent.
Sausages containing the E250 coloring agent and preservative become dangerous when cooked over 300 degrees, over an open fire or when smoke touches the meat.
Who knew that a spice used from ancient times as a coloring agent in foods could also keep plastic-packaged dill pickles fresh?
LaFuente's "skin"--approximately a millimeter-and-a-half thick--is made up of two layers of silicone and nylon, separated by a space into which a coloring agent can be injected.
2 European regulation (cf Annexe i European directive on coloring agents) Influence of the European regulation on the coloring agent market
Curcumin, the yellow pigment and primary nutraceutical compound found in turmeric, is used as a coloring agent by the food industry, and as an active phytochemical in nutraceuticals.
It functions as a sweetener, natural coloring agent and a flavor enhancer.
In the Orient, Chinese roasted pork is a very popular warmed-over food that uses deep dark-red anka rice as a coloring agent and to increase flavor.
The composition is comprised of at least one goniochromatic coloring agent and an amount of light reflective particles different from the goniochromatic coloring agent.
The "Heavenly Blue" coloring agent in one morning glory (Ipomoea tricolor) and the "Scarlet O'Hara" anthocyanin in its cousin (Ipomoea nil) seem simpler: No metals are involved.