Colostrum

(redirected from colostral)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

colostrum

[kə′las·trəm]
(physiology)
The first milk secreted by the mammary gland during the first days following parturition.

Colostrum

 

in mammals and man, a secretion of the mam-mary glands present for a few days before and after parturition.

Colostrum is a thick, viscous, yellowish fluid with a brackish taste and characteristic odor. It differs from milk in its greater acidity, its higher content of dry matter (especially proteins— mainly albumins and globulins—and fats, minerals, and vitamins), and its lower content of sugar. In kind and combination of nutrients, colostrum is an indispensable food for newborns. It contains a large quantity of immune bodies and antitoxins, which protect the infant from the effects of pathogenic bacteria. In addition, it is a laxative and stimulates the normal activity of the digestive tract. In general, it helps the newborn adapt to extrauterine existence. Animal colostrum is not suitable for industrial processing; it clots quickly upon pasteurization and imparts an unpleasant flavor and poor storage potential to food products containing it. Human colostrum approaches the composition of normal milk by the third day or the end of the first week after labor; animal colostrum, after seven to ten days.

References in periodicals archive ?
Relationships among ewe body condition scores, lamb vigour, colostral quality, milk composition and reproductive performance.
Detailed knowledge about duration of viremia after natural SBV infection and duration of colostral protection are necessary for elaboration of efficient breeding and vaccination strategies.
microelements in colostrums and blood of cows and their calves during colostral nutrition, ACTA.
Measurable immunoreactivity levels were observed in most colostral (third day) and transitional (10th day) milk samples throughout the collection period (> 90%).
Our knowledge of the in-vivo efficacy of hyperimmune bovine colostral milk concentrates suggests that these preparations could prevent, and to a limited extent treat, specific microbial gastrointestinal diseases.
Our current knowledge about the in-vivo efficacy of hyperimmune bovine colostral milk concentrates suggests that these preparations could prevent, and to a limited extent treat, specific microbial gastrointestinal diseases.
Colostral cytokines, along with other immune regulatory proteins such as complement and lactoferrin, are also believed to play an important role in the innate immunity of ruminant neonates (Galyean et al.
Scientists have developed an industrial-scale process for enriching and storing colostral antibodies in a biologically active form.
IgG accounts for approximately 85% to 90% of the immunoglobulins in colostral whey.
Hyperimmune colostral or milk preparations directed towards specific diseases may promote human health in the future, when consumed as part of a health-promoting diet or as supplement to medical treatment regimes (Ashraf et al.
2003) have shown that the concentrations in blood of specific colostral antibodies transferred from the sow to the piglets decline quadratically during the first weeks of life.
Furthermore, colostral leukocytes have been shown to migrate to the peripheral blood in neonatal cattle (Reber et al.