Columella


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Columella

(Lucius Junius Moderatus Columella) (kŏl'yəmĕl`ə), fl. 1st cent. A.D., Latin writer on agriculture, b. Gades (now Cádiz), Spain. Of his work there remains the 12-volume De re rustica, treating general husbandry, the care of domestic animals, and farm management. The 10th book, modeled on Vergil, is in hexameters. A short essay on trees also survives. Columella's Latin is facile and elegant, and his information is surprisingly practical and accurate.

columella

[‚käl·yə′mel·ə]
(anatomy)
(biology)
Any part shaped like a column.
(botany)
A sterile axial body within the capsules of certain mosses, liverworts, and many fungi.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aperture subcircular, strongly oblique to vertical axis of shell; peristome incomplete, interrupted briefly in parietal region; rim of peristome reflected forming a flaring lip, but this not noticeably enlarged in columella region.
The shell is low spired with well rounded whorls, no umbilicus, smooth aperture, base of the columella has strong pointed tooth, brown or green spiral lines and dashes on shell, bright green algae often covers shell, (Khan and Dastagir, 1970) (Fig.
In the frame, as our Editor, a Kentish gentleman, and a Canon ride in a coach from Bath to London, the Canon reads his manuscript account of a man he and the Kentish gentleman knew at Oxford, Cornelius Milward, nicknamed Columella for his interest in Lucius Junius Moderatus Columella's De Re Rustica.
Seneca believes that the king bees are not only bigger, but also more beautiful, and Columella tells us that they have various shiny colours and are larger than their subjects.
Euglandininae (Baker 1941) the shells usually are medium- to large-sized ovate or elongate-ovate, and they have a truncated columella ending at the base of the aperture.
I consider a fold to be any ridge on the inner lip of the aperture that extends along the columella for a number of whorls, usually extending all the way to the apex.
Consequently, the Roman farming system required large quantities of straw as bedding to capture and retain livestock manure (Cato, 1967; Columella, 1954).
The maximum outer shell diameter, measured perpendicular to the columella and including the reflected lip, was the primary measure of adult body size of animals sampled during population estimation.
Saeptum' ('septum') is frequently used as a noun, both in singular and plural,(7) by the agricultural writers Varro and Columella.
We used the following shell characters in the analysis: aperture height, aperture width, columella width, lip height, shell height, shell thickness, shell width, whorl breadth (the diameter at the middle of whorls), whorl diameter (at the suture of the whorls), and whorl height.