combustion wave

combustion wave

[kəm′bəs·chən ‚wāv]
(chemistry)
A zone of burning propagated through a combustible medium.
The zoned, reacting, gaseous material formed when an explosive mixture is ignited.
References in periodicals archive ?
The laminar flame speed, also called flame velocity, or burning velocity, is defined as the velocity at which unburned gases move through the combustion wave in the direction normal to the wave surface (Glassman, 1996).
By coating a nanotube in nitrocellulose fuel and igniting one end, we set off a combustion wave along it and learned that a nanotube is an excellent conductor of heat from burning fuel.
The Iranian researcher explained : "By coating a nanotube in nitrocellulose fuel and igniting one end, we set off a combustion wave along it and learned that a nanotube is an excellent conductor of heat from burning fuel.
He opens with fundamental aspects of the conversion from chemical energy to aerothermal energy, covering the foundations of pyrodynamics, the thermochemistry of combustion, and combustion wave propagation.
The unique properties and tortuous paths inherent in these porous metal devices allow cooling or quenching of a flame front, or dampening of a combustion wave.