close

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close

1
restricted or prohibited as to the type of game or fish able to be taken

close

2
1. Law private property, usually enclosed by a fence, hedge, or wall
2. Brit a courtyard or quadrangle enclosed by buildings or an entry leading to such a courtyard
3. Brit a small quiet residential road
4. the precincts of a cathedral or similar building
5. Scot the entry from the street to a tenement building
6. Music another word for cadence. A perfect cadence is called a full close an imperfect one a half close

What does it mean when you dream about closing something?

Closing a door can mean closing a chapter of one’s life. We can also close our hearts to someone or close our eyes to something.

close

[klōs]
(computer science)
To make a file unavailable to a computer program which previously had access to it.
(meteorology)
Colloquially, descriptive of oppressively still, warm, moist air, frequently applied to indoor conditions.

close

1. An enclosed space around or at the side of a building; esp. the neighborhood of a cathedral.
2. A narrow lane leading from a street.

close

(1) To finish reading or writing a document. The close function typically saves any changes made to the document and releases the file so it can be used by another application. Contrast with open.

(2) To exit an application. Contrast with launch.
References in periodicals archive ?
No other foreign policy analyst even comes close to Golitsyn's level of accuracy and depth of analysis.
PA9T provides an excellent fuel barrier that exceeds the performance of nylons 6 and 12 by a factor of 10 and comes close to levels for ETFE fluoropolymer.
Williams comes close to that balance in only a few pieces: "1987" and "Our Father.
Bejart has always preferred that his heroines be passionate, characters with an emphasis that at times comes close to melodramatic.
One reason has to do with the contrary movements of Wiegman's final chapter, in which she comes close to arguing that we must not reinscribe black women into the modern economy of visibility, then comes close to acknowledging that this argument entails the position that we need not concern ourselves with whether black women occupy positions of power (whether in university faculties, corporate boardrooms, or elected offices), then tacks back and argues that "I am not saying that the project of reconstructing Western knowledges about minoritized people is not an important, indeed vital, aspect of cultural struggle," before concluding the book with a reading of Uncle Tom's Cabin.
The architects accepted the traditional relationship of house to garden: indeed in such an area, it would have been difficult to have done otherwise, so at its widest point the building comes close to the long boundaries.
Such importance attaches to numinous women, both in Spenser and in this discussion, that the work of correctly informing one's view of such women comes close to preempting the right poet's" more general interest in taming and informing desire; masculinist though it may appear (must all lines of enraptured sight meet in one object, however transfigured?
enemies' list comes close to acquiring a clear weapon, apoplexy breaks out in Washington, quickly followed by chest-thumping for a pre-emptive strike.
Elaine Brown's almost tell-all memoir, A Taste of Power: A Black Woman's Story, though tedious at times, comes close to the best.
Indeed, Rubenstein comes close to an "Officer Krupke" argument ("I'm depraved on account of I'm deprived"): It's really the fault of society if people become terrorists.
They haven't seen another system in the market that comes close to these performance levels.
It's safe to say that three years after its premiere, no TV series comes close to the levels of hilarious comic anarchy, devastatingly dark drama and the uncanny ability to meld the two seamlessly that FX's ``Rescue Me'' manages on an almost weekly basis.