GRIP

(redirected from coming to grips)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.
Related to coming to grips: come off, in favor of, set out, in line with, came to grips

grip

1. Tools any device that holds by friction, such as certain types of brake
2. TV, Cinema a worker in a camera crew or a stagehand who shifts sets and props, etc.
3. Engineering a small drainage channel cut above an excavation to conduct surface water away from the excavation

grip

[grip]
(ordnance)
One of a pair of wooden or plastic items designed to be attached by threaded fasteners to the two sides of the frame of a weapon, such as a revolver or bayonet; it is shaped to fit the hand and to provide a formed surface to hold the weapon.

grip

grip, 2
1. Of a mechanical fastener: the thickness of the material or parts which the fastener is designed to secure when assembled.
2. Of a rivet: the thickness of the plates or parts through which the rivet passes.
3. A channel that carries away rain water from a foundation, during its construction.

GRIP

Graph Reduction In Parallel.

Simon Peyton Jones's GRIP machine built at UCL, now at the University of Glasgow. It has many processors (Motorola 68020 or other) on Futurebus with intelligent memory units.

GRIP

(Globally Resilient IP) Features built into Cisco's IOS router operating system in 2002 that eliminate packet loss during a router switchover. Such features include Stateful Switchover, which transfers the state of the original router to the standby router, while Nonstop Forwarding maintains packet flow during the switchover.
References in periodicals archive ?
Worrying about--no, coming to grips with--the "little picture" will do a lot more for the health of your unit's equipment and gear.
In terms of more complex life insurance product offerings, like variable universal life or universal life, it's really coming to grips with the tax issues that will make companies take this slower, wait-and-see approach to see how quickly the market moves to the 2001 CSO," he said.
It's possible that Religious Right leaders may finally be coming to grips with the fact that a school prayer amendment to the Constitution may be difficult to pass any time soon, and until the makeup of the Supreme Court changes, the justices are unlikely to alter the ban on school-sponsored religious outreach.
That's the question European Union member states are coming to grips with following the revelation that the Restriction on the Use of Certain Hazardous Materials (RoHS) Directive may contain a loophole that will permit the use of tin-lead-plated components under certain circumstances.
The boom-towns of years ago, built around the extraction of wood and the mining of minerals, have been replaced by communities coming to grips with the depletion of those resources or the capitalization of those industries.
With the world economy slowly shifting out of first gear, Brazil's automobile plants are still coming to grips with their excess capacity, Industry leaders are looking for new production strategies or difficult cost-cutting methods.
As a result, Howson can acquit Knollys of "Anabaptism" without fully coming to grips with the relationship of English Particular Baptists to continental Anabaptism.
On the sound side, the pitched battles within and among stereotypical (and very genuine) Italian families gloriously evoke a culture coming to grips, through the sensibilities of its first- and second-generation offspring, with the ways of a new homeland.
Fred Caron, an assistant deputy minister with the Privy Council Office, admitted that government has had a hard time coming to grips with Metis rights issues.
San Antonio is a prime example of a city and river coming to grips with each other's inevitability.
Building a culture where messengers are not shot increases the chances of a CEO coming to grips with the fact that a wrong has occurred.
THE Sandbaek Report, copper- fastened by the European Parliament, is a positive step in the process of coming to grips with the mortality statistics on pregnant and child-bearing women in the developing world.