commensurable

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Related to commensurability: incommensurability

commensurable

Maths
a. having a common factor
b. having units of the same dimensions and being related by whole numbers

commensurable

(kŏ-men -shŭ-ră-băl) Denoting orbital periods that are in rational proportion, i.e. in which one is a simple fraction (one-half, one-quarter, two-thirds, etc.) of the other. The condition is described as a commensurability. It is observed, for instance, between the orbital periods of planets (e.g. Neptune : Pluto is 2:3), and satellites (e.g. Io : Europa is 1:2). Commensurabilities arise from the effects of resonance.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is simply a statement of commensurability, a commensurability achieved through the reflection of a particular psychological process--involuntary memory--used by Proust.
This commensurability can be achieved if all fertility is understood by reference to capital, rather than, as Marx would have it, all capital in land is understood by reference to (natural) fertility.
For a wide-ranging discussion about the value of proportionality in intellectual property that goes far beyond the targeted arguments about the commensurability of technological contribution and claim scope made here, see ROBERT P.
The commensurability between Heidegger's Event and Heizer's cleft rests on a "fluctuating relation between presence and absence, figuration and nonfiguration, representability and unrepresentability" (93).
Underlying this connection is the authors' view about the commensurability of the five types of harm.
Although the topic of commensurability has been discussed extensively by philosophers, lawyers, and others for more than two decades,(1) the typical discussion of commensurability is an inquiry in moral ontology.
2) In healthcare, standardizing is the enactment of care activities designed to promote uniformity, stability and commensurability of professional thought, meaning, actions and outcomes.
Money offers the possibility of ultimate commensurability across all cultures and boundaries.
One advantage of understanding the principle against viewpoint discrimination as deriving from the commitment to equal civic standing is that it raises the possibility of commensurability between the competing claims of right in the hate speech controversy.
Wang's model (2014) of commensurability offers potential for bridging across these differing perspectives.
Engagement of such considerations quickly takes us down a path toward a more general debate regarding issues of commensurability and parity, a debate that is well beyond the scope of this article.
While we would not want to suggest a simple commensurability between what are evidently distinct forms of politics, we nonetheless find it illuminating to think from these unthinkable examples to existing anti-poverty movements; this allows us to acknowledge the creative tension between unthinkable politics and existing forms of solidarities that push for inclusion and recognition (but are not necessarily anti-establishment).