common language

common language

[¦käm·ən ¦laŋ·gwij]
(computer science)
A machine-readable language that is common to a group of computers and associated equipment.
References in classic literature ?
I had observed on the two occasions when I had seen her that the prisoner exchanged words with her guards, and this convinced me that they spoke, or at least could make themselves understood by a common language.
Taking with her some jewels that belonged to her and a sum of money, she quitted Italy with an attendant, a native of Leghorn, but who understood the common language of Turkey, and departed for Germany.
I am sure you could teach me a thousand things--as an exquisite bird could teach a bear if there were any common language between them.
she exclaimed, and then, in the vernacular of the great apes which constant association with the anthropoids had rendered the common language of the Oparians: "You have come back to me
As Meriem became proficient in their common language the pleasures of their companionship grew correspondingly, for now they could converse and aided by the mental powers of their human heritage they amplified the restricted vocabulary of the apes until talking was transformed from a task into an enjoyable pastime.
Four generations had not sufficed to blend the hostile blood of the Normans and Anglo-Saxons, or to unite, by common language and mutual interests, two hostile races, one of which still felt the elation of triumph, while the other groaned under all the consequences of defeat.
These are inhabited by as many distinct tribes of savages, who, although speaking kindred dialects of a common language, and having the same religion and laws, have from time immemorial waged hereditary warfare against each other.
It is a common language with the Iroquois, and through the Canadas,” he answered, smiling.
To common language, the word is now completely obsolete.
They were trying to explain, not for the first time, as their weary gestures and frequent interruptions showed, what in their common language they had christened their "lapses"; a constant source of distress to them, in the past few days, and the immediate reason why Ralph was on his way to leave the house when Katharine, listening anxiously, heard him and prevented him.
Many parts of the world have linguistic diversity and history and linguistics tell that in such situations a common language is adopted to facilitate the communication.
HUW Beynon's letter (Western Mail, July 18) raises the debate of how if we all spoke a common language (notably English in Huw Beynon's letter) it could lead to peace and goodwill across the world, and it is our incessant babbling in many tongues that can ultimately lead to conflict.