common-mode rejection


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common-mode rejection

[¦käm·ən ‚mōd ri′jek·shən]
(electronics)
The ability of an amplifier to cancel a common-mode signal while responding to an out-of-phase signal. Also known as in-phase rejection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the existing 1 kV safety-rated HVD310x probes, these new probes provide excellent performance by offering the best gain accuracy, widest differential voltage range, high offset range and exceptional common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR).
A high common-mode rejection ratio improves the distortion performance of an amplifier when used in a non-inverting feedback configuration, which is the standard topology for most power amps.
The AD8205 also has very high common-mode rejection of 80 dB, which extends from DC up to 100 kHz.
Part Two includes content on the main parameters and system analysis in RF circuit design, the fundamentals of differential pair and common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR), Balun, and system-on-a-chip (SOC).
New High Voltage Differential Probes Provide High Common-Mode Rejection Ratio Across a Wide Frequency Range
The Ampzilla 2000 uses two stages of differential voltage amplification, instead of a single stage, to enhance the common-mode rejection ratio.
In addition, high common-mode rejection ratio results in a small-signal processing accuracy 18 times better than what can be achieved with ordinary low voltage operational amplifiers, making them ideal for sensor signal amplification.
With high common-mode rejection (CMR) of 30 kV/s, the ACPL-x484 optocouplers prevent erroneous driving of an IPM and provide reliable operation in noisy environments.
First device to combine wide common-mode range (-14 V to +80 V) and high common-mode rejection ratio (120 dB) with low offset voltage across multiple gain options.
Read the application note, "Improving Common-Mode Rejection Using the Right-Leg Drive Amplifier": www.
The package improves isolation performance with minimum common-mode rejection (CMR) of 30 kV/s for superior noise toleration, resulting in smoother control with less torque ripple in motor control applications.