common-mode rejection

common-mode rejection

[¦käm·ən ‚mōd ri′jek·shən]
(electronics)
The ability of an amplifier to cancel a common-mode signal while responding to an out-of-phase signal. Also known as in-phase rejection.
References in periodicals archive ?
The device's fully differential input structure features high common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) of more than 100 dB and a high impedance of more than 500 MOhms, which results in improved low common-to-differential mode conversion.
8, the measured common-mode rejection ratios of all types of the corresponding transfer functions are shown.
Specifications include 5-MHz sampling speed, an 18-bit A/D converter, and 80-dB at 100-kHz common-mode rejection ratio.
The amplifier enables higher common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) and power supply rejection ratio (PSRR) at all gain settings.
Though this topology can achieve common-mode rejection (CMRR) above 80 dB at DC, the CMRR dramatically degrades as frequency increases.
These filter showed stopband extension [11], good common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) [12], and dual-band [13] performances.
Since this common-mode level can lead to undesired radiation and EMI problems that degrades the performance of high-speed circuitry, a lot of effort has been devoted to the design of differential devices with high common-mode rejection [1-8].
To provide a simple figure-of-merit for characterizing the implement differential filter, the common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) can be defined by
A ground-sensing CMOS input that provides a common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) of 120 dB.
A high common-mode rejection ratio improves the distortion performance of an amplifier when used in a non-inverting feedback configuration, which is the standard topology for most power amps.
These differential LNAs offer an optimum common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR), K = CMRR = 20 log([A.