common

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common

1. Maths
a. having a specified relationship with a group of numbers or quantities
b. (of a tangent) tangential to two or more circles
2. Anatomy
a. having branches
b. serving more than one function
3. Christianity of or relating to the common of the Mass or divine office
4. a tract of open public land, esp one now used as a recreation area
5. Law the right to go onto someone else's property and remove natural products, as by pasturing cattle or fishing (esp in the phrase right of common)
6. Christianity
a. a form of the proper of the Mass used on festivals that have no special proper of their own
b. the ordinary of the Mass

Common

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Mercury is a neutral planet in the sense that it is neither feminine nor masculine, neither malefic nor benefic, etc. As a planet that tends to take on the traits of its sign and house placement more readily than other planets, the astrological tradition has characterized Mercury as a common (meaning, in this case, neutral) planet. “Common signs” is another designation for mutable signs (Gemini, Virgo, Sagittarius, and Pisces), which represent a kind of halfway point between the two extremes of cardinal and fixed signs and are thus common (again in the sense of neutral).

common

A large plot of grassy, fenced-in, publicly owned land, generally at or near the center of a village or town; in earlier eras, once shared by the townspeople as a pasture.
References in classic literature ?
Thus, the term used in the title of this book has undergone the changes of Mahicanni, Mohicans, and Mohegans; the latter being the word commonly used by the whites.
In my young days, the great man of the town was commonly called King; and his wife, not Queen to be sure, but Lady.
To those who have not chanced specially to study the subject, it may possibly seem strange, that fishes not commonly exceeding four or five feet should be marshalled among WHALES --a word, which, in the popular sense, always conveys an idea of hugeness.
In disposing of the body of a right whale, when brought alongside the ship, the same preliminary proceedings commonly take place as in the case of a sperm whale; only, in the latter instance, the head is cut off whole, but in the former the lips and tongue are separately removed and hoisted on deck, with all the well known black bone attached to what is called the crown-piece.
The slight reproach to which the virtue of patriotism is commonly liable, the noble are most likely to incur.
To enjoy a thing exclusively is commonly to exclude yourself from the true enjoyment of it.
And from her great, her more than commonly thankful delight towards Mrs.
His situation indeed was more than commonly joyful.
She certainly seemed in no laughing predicament: her hair streamed on her shoulders, dripping with snow and water; she was dressed in the girlish dress she commonly wore, befitting her age more than her position: a low frock with short sleeves, and nothing on either head or neck.
There was nothing in this action to attract my particular attention, for I had seen common people struck more commonly than dogs.
Coming before me, on this particular evening that I mention, mingled with the childish recollections and later fancies, the ghosts of half-formed hopes, the broken shadows of disappointments dimly seen and understood, the blending of experience and imagination, incidental to the occupation with which my thoughts had been busy, it was more than commonly suggestive.
Raveloe was not a place where moral censure was severe, but it was thought a weakness in the Squire that he had kept all his sons at home in idleness; and though some licence was to be allowed to young men whose fathers could afford it, people shook their heads at the courses of the second son, Dunstan, commonly called Dunsey Cass, whose taste for swopping and betting might turn out to be a sowing of something worse than wild oats.