companion

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companion

1
Astronomy the fainter of the two components of a double star

companion

2
Nautical
a. a raised frame on an upper deck with windows to give light to the deck below
b. (as modifier): a companion ladder

companion

[kəm′pan·yən]
(astronomy)
References in classic literature ?
But do you see, Professor," replied our irascible companion, "that we shall absolutely die of hunger in this iron cage?
She now trembled lest any of her companions should come near here to examine her picture, when the regular breathing or some deeper breath might reveal to them, as it had to her, the presence of this political victim.
The object of this halt was to give Biscarrat and his companions time to describe to him the interior of the grotto.
He glanced once at the companion's face, saw her attentive and kindly gaze fixed on him, and, as often happens when one is talking, felt somehow that this companion in the black dress was a good, kind, excellent creature who would not hinder his conversing freely with Princess Mary.
But his companions were not listening; they were taking up their last positions with the most perfect coolness.
But bid thy companion eat and drink also, he is wearier than thou.
His two companions listened, as people in their situation would be apt to lend their faculties to discover the meaning of any doubtful noises, especially, when heard after so many and such startling warnings.
The child was pale and wan, but her healthy arms and legs showed that she had suffered less than her companion.
The companion of the church dignitary was a man past forty, thin, strong, tall, and muscular; an athletic figure, which long fatigue and constant exercise seemed to have left none of the softer part of the human form, having reduced the whole to brawn, bones, and sinews, which had sustained a thousand toils, and were ready to dare a thousand more.
My companion and I being undeceived by this terrible relation, thought it would be the highest imprudence to expose ourselves both together to a death almost certain and unprofitable, and agreed that I should go with our Abyssin and a Portuguese to observe the country; that if I should prove so happy as to escape being killed by the inhabitants, and to discover a way, I should either return, or send back the Abyssin or Portuguese.
I went on up the companion, staring at him instinctively as I did so.
rejoined her companion, still gazing towards the miserable object; "and if he should be ill