compensatory education


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compensatory education

a system of education designed to compensate pupils for the disadvantages they experience as a consequence of deficiencies in their social backgrounds and environments. Research undertaken by sociologists, mainly in the 1950s and early 1960s, suggested that children of lower-class parents, with disadvantaged cultural or ethnic backgrounds, regularly failed to achieve either academically or socially in school. Programmes of compensatory education were introduced in the US (Operation Headstart) and in the UK (Educational Priority Areas) during the 1960s and 70s. It is generally held that the approach has been unsuccessful, with poor levels of achievement by the socially disadvantaged continuing. The main reason for this is likely to be that piecemeal educational reforms of this sort, undertaken without any other kind of significant structural change, cannot compensate for the deficiencies of society, especially when schools themselves are part of society's value structures, and when pupils remain in the social setting which caused the initial problem. Also see ACCESS.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Third Circuit precedent, a child's right to compensatory education accrues from the point that the school district knows or should know of its failure to provide a FAPE.
For example, the late Paul Wellstone, a Democrat from Minnesota, failed in his attempt to defer the new annual testing requirements unless funding for compensatory education was tripled; Kennedy, Lieberman, and Bayh all voted against it.
Because compensatory education currently is being established as a remedy for IDEA violations and the potential for the award of monetary damages is increasing, school professionals should intensify their efforts to ensure the provision of FAPE for qualified students with disabilities and to avoid all procedures that put students at any risk.
For an investment of $39,000, we can provide a child with prenatal care and preventive health services through age 18 as well as enrollment in Head Start, compensatory education, summer jobs during high school and four years of public college education.
My compensatory education position was eliminated, and was declared excess.
For example, the National Academy of Science panel that studied placement practices in special education concluded that there is "no educational justification for the current categorization system that separates these three [mildly retarded, learning disabled, and compensatory education or Chapter 1] groups in the schools" (Heller, Holtzman, & Messick, 1982, p.
The movement got a major boost in 1994, when Title I--the flagship federal compensatory education program--was amended to require states to create performance-based accountability systems for schools.
She also sought compensatory monetary damages, equitable relief in the form of compensatory education, and attorney's fees.
I posit that the structure of African-American parents' participation reflects two dominant traditions in professional thought: first, the deficit view of African-American families on which compensatory education practices have been based, and, second, the medical model on which special education is based and the resulting deficit view of African-American children that has been promulgated by continued misassessment and miseducation.
September 1994: The White House declares private school choice pilot a success and wins congressional approval to convert entire $8 billion federal budget for Chapter 1 compensatory education into vouchers redeemable at private schools.
Pilot compensatory education programs for lower-primary out-of-school children (6-9 years of age) in rural communities.
Specifically, she presents the following issues and concerns: (1) All students with disabilities are still not being taught to high level and sufficiently comprehensive standards; (2) Multiple measures in assessment need to be used for the testing of students with disabilities; (3) Parent communities are not adequately involved in school improvement efforts as required by NCLB making schools less accountable to parents; (4) Schools and school districts are not providing the necessary resources to be accountable for delivering high quality instruction and services; and (5) Supplemental educational services and remedial or compensatory education often deny students with disabilities the specialized instruction they need to benefit from the course of instruction.