complementary base pairing


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complementary base pairing

[‚käm·plə¦men·tə·rē ¦bās ′per·iŋ]
(cell and molecular biology)
The formation of weak hydrogen bonds between complementary nitrogenous bases (for example, guanine and cytosine) on opposite strands of a double-stranded nucleic acid molecule (such as deoxyribonucleic acid), contributing to the overall stability of the double-stranded structure.
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The students already knew about complementary base pairing from a previous chapter, so I had them collaborate in pairs to work on the base pairing for DNA, mRNA, and tRNA, noting the replacement of thymine (T) by uracil (U) in RNA.
Complementary base pairing can only occur between the sense ssDNA strand and the antisense primer, and the antisense ssDNA strand and the sense primer [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED].
Also known as complementary base pairing, the hydrogen bonding of both A to T and C to G is in a 1:1 ratio.
When linked by complementary base pairing, the two strands that comprise dsDNA are called sense and antisense strands, where the DNA antisense strand is the complementary base pair copy of the DNA sense strand [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED].

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