complexing agent


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Related to complexing agent: Chelating agent, chelate, EDTA

complexing agent

[′käm‚plek·siŋ ‚ā·jənt]
(chemistry)
A substance capable of forming a complex compound with another material in solution.
References in periodicals archive ?
PDFAS as a selective complexing agent and Tergitol TMN-6 as a non-ionic surfactant were applied to the process of cloud point extraction with low LOD and good results.
8-12) Some investigations have also been done concerning the influences of the concentrations of metal salt, reducing agents, complexing agents, temperature, pH, and additives on the deposition rate.
2010, "Effect of complexing agent on growth process and properties of nanostructured [Bi.
BSOPD related complexing agents have also found applications as spectrophotmetric derivatizing reagents for metal ions in CE and HPLC [22, 23].
In the early eighties, differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE), which does not require a complexing agent, was very popular because of its high sensitivity, especially when a longer deposition time was e mployed to pre-concentrate the metals.
The thickness of ZnS films was determined depending on the amount of complexing agent of trisodium citrate and deposition time.
When a complexing agent was added to hydrochloride salt as shown in Figure 7, the melting point rapidly reallocated to lower temperature.
Lot 2: study of chlorine pesticides, alkylphenols, alkyl phosphates, PAHs, phthalates, organotins, brominated pesticides and sythetischen complexing agents.
In tissue fluids and cell culture media, the situation is radically different owing to the presence of a wide variety of natural metal complexing agents (chelators), such as amino acids, peptides, proteins, nucleotides, and glutathione, which may bind and profoundly affect the redox potential of these metals (Holmes and Williams 2000) or their dioxygen coordination capacity (Boca 1983; Van Horn et al.
Complexing agents such as ammonia, cyanide, citrate and so on can result in metals forming neutral or even negatively charged complex ions which are either not removed by the resins or are removed by the anion resin, making recovery difficult.
However, many plant foods also contain endogenous inhibitors that reduce the activity of glycosidases, in particular proteins, peptides, complexing agents and phenolic compounds.