compliment


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to compliment: complement

compliment

Spelled compl-i-ment, the English word meaning "praise." Spelled compl-e-ment, the term refers to numbers. See complement.
References in classic literature ?
With infinite pleasure, ma'am," said the captain, drowning in the deepest notes of his voice the feeble treble in which Noel Vanstone paid his compliments to Magdalen.
He rose, and, paying the customary compliments to the mistress of the mansion, withdrew.
George was proud of her popularity, and pleased with the manner (which was very gay and graceful, though naive and a little timid) with which she received the gentlemen's attentions, and answered their compliments.
If the same annual compliment would be acceptable there, why, I see nothing to part us, unless you do.
Then my compliment ought to be eloquent," said Stephen, really not quite knowing what he said while Maggie looked at him, "seeing that the words were so far beneath the occasion.
No compliment can be eloquent, except as an expression of indifference," said Maggie, flushing a little.
Which that were my own belief," answered Joe - "her compliments to Mrs.
Wopsle gave us Collins's ode, and threw his bloodstain'd sword in thunder down, with such effect, that a waiter came in and said, "The Commercials underneath sent up their compliments, and it wasn't the Tumblers' Arms.
The next time you write to your good father, Miss Elliot, pray give him my compliments and Mrs Croft's, and say that we are settled here quite to our liking, and have no fault at all to find with the place.
Franklin Blake presents his compliments to Miss Clack, and begs to thank her for the fifth chapter of her narrative.
The very last man on this earth with whom I would enter the lists to combat with gentle compliments and masked faces, is Mr Chester, I do assure you.
Indeed he so overflowed with liberality and condescension, that, in the fulness of his heart, he invited Mr Swiveller to partake of a bowl of punch with him at that remote and indefinite period which is currently denominated 'one of these days,' and paid him many handsome compliments on the uncommon aptitude for business which his conduct on the first day of his devotion to it had so plainly evinced.