composite hypothesis

composite hypothesis

[kəm′päz·ət hī′päth·ə·səs]
(statistics)
A hypothesis that specifies a range of values for the distribution of the observed random variables.
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Among their topics are combining information across genome-wide linkage scans, heterogeneity in the meta-analysis of quantitative trait linkage studies, an approach to composite hypothesis testing built on intersection-union tests and Bayesian posterior probabilities, significance testing for small microarray experiments, combining genomic data in human studies, and a misclassification model for inferring transcriptional regulatory networks.
The answer to this question provides guidance for determining when a composite hypothesis (i.
Guideline 1: A joint test of a composite hypothesis ought to be used if an inference or conclusion requires multiple hypotheses to be simultaneously true.
If an independent variable is considered to be simultaneously related to a number of dependent variables, then a joint test of a composite hypothesis is warranted.
If so, then a single hypothesis test is warranted; if not, then consideration should be given to the possibility of a composite hypothesis.
Rejecting a joint test of a composite hypothesis does not tell us which specific alternative case is warranted.