composite photograph


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composite photograph

[kəm′päz·ət ′fōd·ə‚graf]
(graphic arts)
An assembly of separate photographs, made by several lenses of a multiple-lens camera in simultaneous exposure, into the equivalent of a photograph made with a wide-angle lens.
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For the chapter on the United States, Henry Bowditch's composite photographs, the vast collection of the American Eugenics Records Office, the work of Charles Davenport, and Henry Goddard's study of the Kallikak family provide a solid demonstration of the critical role photography played for the American eugenicists.
As a number of people saw (him during the talks), we could likely draw his picture or make a composite photograph (to confirm if he is the real person),'' Senior Vice Foreign Minister Ichiro Aisawa said on a TV Asahi talk show.
The result is a seamless composite photograph that looks as if it were shot on location.
Goody's Headache Powders created a composite photograph with each contestant featured within a medal and checkered flags design.
Meanwhile, a senior Foreign Ministry official said Sunday the government is considering making a composite photograph of a North Korean man Pyongyang claims to have been Yokota's husband.
One of the composite photographs shows Ian Wright walking his dog while, across from him, a British squaddie struggles up a dusty road as a helicopter lands nearby.
Surrealist as they may appear, each of Abdul Massih's composite photographs relates a story, defends a cause or conveys a particular emotion.
The composite photographs of the average male and female winners were created using similar techniques to photofit pictures used by police, based on a mixture of facial features which reflect a sample of winners in the UK, Camelot said.
Composite photographs of her facial bones that combine an image of either the left or right side and its mirror image look much different than an unmanipulated photo does.
In the opening film, he traces how we have attempted to visualise the face of evil, from the early religious images of the devil dating from 900 AD to the pseudo-scientific representations of the 19th century, to the composite photographs of criminals in London and waxwork death masks in Turin.
The show opened with a selection of the early-'80s composite photographs for which she is best known.

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